A BIG Thank You

While plugging away on my latest writing project (have I mentioned I am writing a book?!) an email came through my inbox with the subject line: A Big Thank You.

I thought, what could this be? What have I done recently? As I opened the email with joy and anticipation, I read the bolded copy below from a past client.

Filled with gratitude, I share these words with you today. Cheers to you and good health, and a BIG thank you to those who have welcomed me into their lives, asking for help on nutrition.

 

Hi Kelly,
 
I hope you, your family, and your business are doing well! I just wanted to send you a thank you email for all of your help! With your help and the addition of the pump, I have achieved awesome bg readings! My CDE has been amazed saying she does not see this kind of stability with Type 1s, and to keep doing what I’m doing! I’m not sure you remember, but I was so excited to meet you after finding you online, seeing your services, and seeing your bg readings. I was amazed with your bg readings, and you gave me inspiration to know that tight control of T1D is possible! So, thank you so much!
 
Sincerely,
Anonymous 

On the Go? Constantly Traveling? #Health #NoExcuses

Along with yesterday’s blog post, “Client FAQ: When Traveling What Can I Prep/Eat?” I thought I would elaborate even more.

Too often I hear of reasons people cannot focus on their health due to workload, work travel and just always being on the run. Guess what? This doesn’t give you a hall-pass to eat at Five Guys, Popeye’s or Taco Hell. Sorry, I mean, “Bell.” But let’s be realistic. Just as you plan meetings each day/week, you can also plan in short workouts and meals, portable or not. To assist in the thought process here are some pointers to help you along.

What to pack in your handbag/suite-case:

  • Macadamia nuts
  • Wild tuna in water, canned
  • Willd salmon, canned
  • Hard boiled eggs
  • Lindt 85%/90% dark chocolate
  • Grass-fed and gluten free jerky
  • Dried fruit (prunes, figs, dates)
  • Raw fruit, portable

Now onto meals…

Breakfast:

  • This is where some of those hard-boiled eggs can come in hand. Pair a few eggs with a to-go coffee and be on your way to your first meeting.
  • Breakfast joints/diners – over-easy eggs, bacon or gluten free sausage. Double score if you can get some sauteed vegetables (spinach, mushrooms) and if the eggs are organic free range.
  • Starbucks- black coffee or tea, Kind bar and some fruit – or –
  • Starbucks black coffee or tea, Protein pack: Cage-free egg, white Cheddar cheese, honey peanut butter spread, multigrain muesli bread, apples and grapes, but perhaps avoid the bread and peanut butter. Assess dairy for your best needs – or –
  • Starbucks black coffee or tea and one of their hot sandwiches sans the bread (and perhaps cheese)
  • Subway ask for one of the egg breakfast sandwiches without bread
  • McDonald’s ask for scrambled eggs and apple slices – or – fruit and walnut breakfast, avoid eating the processed yogurt.
  • Burger King ask for scrambled eggs and apple slices – or – ham omelette sandwich with no bread
  • Dunkin Donuts has a large breakfast sandwich menu. Ask for one of the breakfast meat/egg combo without the bun.

Lunch/Dinner:

Arby’s the Roast beef plain is your best bet. You can pair it with a plain salad or apple slices. Their Angus beef is gluten free but not the purest of proteins. It contains soy as a filler. Their sauce is also heavy in corny syrup. Corned beef is on the same level as the Angus beef as id the Roasted Turkey. If you are itching for a condiment the sauerkraut and aoli is at least gluten free.

Subway – you can build a salad with an assortment of vegetables and proteins.

Chipotle – this is my go-to place. Their products are locally sourced, when able, and their meat comes from grassfed beef, pasture-raised pork and free range chicken. I opt for the pork, because it is not cooked in soybean oil. The purest order is their bowl – choose a protein, I go for all 3 salsa’s (not the corn), lettuce, and guacamole. This is more than enough food even without the rice, beans and cheese. #EatClean

Jimmy Johns – I love  a place that has an unwhich. Instead of bread, Jimmy John’s wrap a sandwich in a lettuce wrap. Depending on my schedule I may get double meat and always some avocado.

If I you have the chance to sit-down somewhere, perhaps with a client, ask for a gluten free menu and build/choose a meal starting with protein and then pair it with some vegetables, and this does not include French fries.

Even if you order room service, choose real food, in it’s purest form (salad, steak, fish with steamed vegetables and some wine for dessert), and do not overeat. You are already likely to not sleep well in a new bed and having a full stomach will not help.

On the go often? Dismissing your health is not a choice. Small changes can have big outcomes. Start today.

Cheers to you and good health,

Kel

 

Client FAQ: When Traveling What Can I Prep/Eat?

I easily answer this question once a week. Regardless if I have a client traveling for the week for work, on the road daily for sales meetings, or just plain busy, people always want to know what to pack/snack and eat for their meals.

Client Question: Kelly, I’m on the road this week, what would you pack to keep things healthy and satisfying for all 3 meals?

Kelly: I know this gig well. The last 2 years I was on the road weekly and sometimes weeks at a time. Depending on what your travel looks like, here are some ideas:

hard boiled eggs are great for early morning flights. Even better, pair 2-3 eggs with some raw veggies. Get a coffee at the airport and you are good to go.

In your handbag/briefcase have macadamia nuts, dark chocolate, fresh fruit, even canned tuna or canned salmon. You can pick up a plain salad from about anywhere and top it with some solid protein.

If you are staying somewhere overnight, don’t hesitate to go to the grocery store and a gourmet gas station and get a few items for your mini fridge. I’ve bough large bags of dark leafy greens, guacamole, deli meat, olives, etc to have for dinner after a long day. I may have paired this with a glass of red wine, but I was saving money, managing what I was eating and I didn’t feel exhausted after a long week.

No doubt though, eating in on the road is not always realistic. My go-to’s are Chipotle (bowl with pork, all 3 salsas, lettuce and guacamole), Jimmy Johns (an unwich with extra meat and avocado) or a non-chain restaurant and build/choose a meal based on protein and vegetables. Of course. always gluten free.

While traveling, sleep can be rough and the travel can dehydrate you. Always have some water on hand and bring along some herb teas to help you wind down in the evening.

More snack ideas can be found here.

What are your go-to foods while traveling?

Ketogenic Diets

First and foremost, let me start off with saying ketosis and ketoacidosis (DKA) are two very different things.

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication in patients with diabetes, predominantly in those with type 1 diabetes. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids and producing acidic ketone bodies that cause most of the symptoms and complications.1 An example of how someone with diabetes, such as myself, can be in a state of ketoacidosis is say when my insulin pump has problems delivering me insulin due to a kink in the site (connection on my body) or blood in the tubing and therefore the needed insulin is not getting in my body.

Ketosis or a ketogenic diet, on the other hand, is a high-fat, adequate protein, low-carbohydrate diet forcing the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates, thus a fat burning mode.

Medical professionals are using ketogenic, carb restricted diets to:

And many people have discovered that a ketogenic diet is a very effective tool for regaining health, losing excess weight and building a muscular, healthy body. Among those having success with ketogenic diets includes low carb advocate, Jimmy Moore, which he has published these 12 foods to serve him well for his nutrition ketosis objective.

Furthermore, a client has agreed to share his regime when he dabbles with ketosis and it looks  something like this:

Pre-Breakfast – Start off with a huge glass of ice cold water, along with fish oil, magnesium, Vitamin C, D, and zinc to help with inflammation (this helps a ton with recovery for tough work outs)

Breakfast – Another glass of water to start meal, huge bowl of spinach, some tomatoes (sometimes I get lazy and just eat spinach), 3 slices of bacon, a sausage patty, and 2 eggs.

Post-Breakfast – Cup of coffee, no cream. Stevia.

Lunch* – 1 Large glass of water along with the supplements in Prebreakfast. 2 Salmon patties or some sort of protein, maybe steak or chicken thighs (I don’t use breasts as they don’t contain enough fat). If its a lean piece of meat, I cut up a half avocado to get some fat content in, OR and don’t hate me for this, I put mayo, and a big bowl of spinach.

Snack – Usually some beef jerky or pork rinds… hahahahaha

Pre-Workout Drink – BCAA’s, Protein Whey and Creatine. It helps me with recovery.

Post Workout Drink – Same as above.

Dinner – Same as Lunch*.

Additional comments: IF I work out, the meal immediately after, if its either lunch or dinner, I cut out the spinach, as I’m looking for two sources of fuel at this point: Fat and protein. That’s about it. Its a pretty Spartan diet but not changing it helps me stick to it. I use this mainly prior to competitions where I have to lose weight to make a certain weight class in a healthy manner. My BF percentage goes down a ton and my energy levels go way up.

An important thing to note though is that I don’t stay on this diet ALL year. 

If you are interested in implementing a ketogenic diet the Ketogenic Diet Resource website has some detailed advice.

Resources:

Client’s Paleo Transition – Becky Schlageter

Please paint a picture of who you are:

Becky is an Ohio native who moved to Chicago 6 years ago. She has always been passionate about health and wellness. She graduated from Ohio University with a degree in Exercise Physiology and Pre-Physical Therapy. After college she worked in the corporate world for several years, but is now back doing what she loves! She received her NASM Personal Training Certification last year and is now spending most of her time helping others achieve their fitness goals with one-on-one personal training. As well, Becky most recently partnered with Kelly Schmidt, RD, LDN on some health programs/bootcamps. Stay tuned.

What inspired you want to do Paleo?

I was in a rut and bored with my eating habits. I had also read a lot of literature on this diet and many positive reviews, and thought it was worth trying first-hand. So I put myself on Kelly’s Paleo Infused Nutrition Pledge food challenge to see if I could stick the program for 4 weeks; I did! I also wanted to speak intelligently about intuitive nutrition and more easily empathize with my clients who were participating in other food challenges, diets or cleanses.

What is your health goal/objective?

I want to improve digestion and nutrient absorption, as I now know good digestion equals good health. I have always been a healthy eater, but never really noticed my energy levels or regularity being where they should be. I didn’t feel my healthy eating efforts were paying off either. I am always interested in learning more about nutrition and food labels. Lastly, I wanted to drop those 5 lbs clinging to my thighs, which have fallen off eating a real food diet. Success!

What was the most challenging thing in following a paleo diet? How did you overcome this challenge; if you did?

At first, eliminating dairy was the biggest challenge for me. I had been eating greek yogurt, cheese and ice cream regularly for the past few years. First and foremost, I got rid of all the dairy products in my fridge. This helped me stay on track and avoid any temptations. I also did some research and came up with some “dairy alternatives”. I am now borderline obsessed with coconut milk and can’t image going back to drinking regular milk. I also was able to make an amazing non-dairy cheesecake that left me just as satisfied as if I were eating the real thing. My second biggest challenge was not drinking beer. I am an avid beer drinker and love hoppy, craft beers. I was able to completely eliminate beer for the entire month. However, there are some tasty gluten free beer options that I have recently discovered. They don’t leave you feeling as bloated and full. For you Chicagoans-Binny’s, Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods as well as lots of restaurants have a decent gluten free selection.

What was your overall impression of the diet? Do you still follow it?

I honestly loved the diet. I learned a ton about nutrition and how misleading some food labels can be. I also felt better (increased energy, better digestion and healthy skin). Experimenting with all the different recipes was also really fun. If anyone needs any recipes-I have a ton I’ve collected over the past few months. www.paleoomg.com is also an awesome resource for great recipes and fun commentary.

Since completing the challenge, my motto has been “80/20”. I try and stick with it 80% of the time and I give myself a little wiggle room with the other 20%. For example, I was just home for Christmas and there was NO WAY I was not going to have JUST ONE piece of my mom’s homemade fudge. I also think the “80/20” mindset is very healthy. You don’t feel totally defeated if you cheat one day…so be it, just get yourself back on track!

What changes did you see after doing one of Kelly’s Paleo Infused Nutrition Pledges?

As I mentioned above, my digestion, energy and skin were better than before. I also slept better. And, lost those stubborn 5 lbs on my thighs. My awareness of all the crappy food options out there is also worth noting. Every time I go to the store or go out to eat I find myself really scrutinizing the labels and menus. I deem this as a really positive thing and really believe “you are what you eat”.

What advice would you tell someone considering the Pledge?

I would highly recommend the pledge. Go into the pledge and challenge yourself to stick to it 100% for the 4 weeks. Thereafter, you can decide if it’s right for you. I would also recommend anyone considering the pledge to plan ahead. Researching recipes and literature surrounding the premise of the pledge ahead of time will really help you mentally prepare for what lies ahead, ultimately leading to a successful pledge.

What were/are your favorite snacks and meals?

I loved making sweet potato fries. Super cheap and easy. I also made egg “muffins” as a fun breakfast alternative (basically eggs with whatever fixings you want, baked in muffin tins). Homemade nut butter was also a god send. I would eat this along with carrots, celery or an apple for a snack. Beware though-it’s addicting! I also made a lot of smoothies for lunch with fresh fruit and veggies. Adding an avocado to the smoothies gives it an awesome creamy flavor. Spaghetti squash with homemade marinara and chicken sausage, butternut squash with bacon and onions…the list goes on and on.

Any other comments?

Just try it! You have nothing to lose….besides 10 lbs, better sleep and better skin!

 

Becky Schlageter is an excellent Certified Personal Trainer and is passionate about her client’s success. Email Becky at [email protected] if you are in the Chicago area and want some fitness coaching. 

Type 1 Diabetes Paired With a Paleo Diet

I have three main purposes for my website and one is to help educate consumers on the connection between nutrition and health, secondly to describe the philosophy of my counseling services to potential patients to distinguish it from other dietitians/nutritionists and thirdly, to act as a portal for people with type 1 diabetes and those interested in the care for type 1 diabetes to connect, communicate and learn.

That said, I am honored to share the experiences from Keith R. Runyan, MD, a physician in Florida, about his journey with type 1 diabetes.

So often I can write how the paleo diet has changed my life (diabetes), yet, when I see another fellow T1 experiencing similar things, I am inspired to share the story with my audience. Thank you Dr Runyan for allowing me to post this information and keep up the great work with your diabetes and helping your patients.

Dr. Runyan’s story goes something like this…

Background
In medical school, I learned a tremendous amount of information about anatomy, histology, embryology, physiology, biochemistry, cell biology, and genetics, as well as most of the pathologic conditions that affect mankind.  Interestingly, the topic of how nutrition influences or causes disease was lacking.  Of course, we learned about vitamin, mineral, fatty acid, and protein deficiencies and their clinical presentations, but the idea that a diet which deviates from that on which humans evolved to thrive can cause numerous major chronic diseases was not covered or adequately emphasized.  So, over most of the past 20 years, I have been treating these diseases with medications and advice to see a dietitian, thinking that the dietician would be dispensing correct information about what my patients should be eating.

In 1996, I gradually became ill with weight loss initially, then later fatigue, polyuria (excessive urination), polydipsia (excessive thirst), and diarrhea.  Through the powers of denial, of which mine were strong, I was able to ignore these symptoms and continue working.  Even though my wife, other physicians, and nurses noticed the weight loss, I continued to believe the problem would go away on its own.  Eventually, in 1998, having lost 40 lbs. from my originally normal body weight, I could no longer deny I had a problem.  I saw a physician and had some tests run.  My blood sugar was 489 mg/dL, and obviously I had diabetes mellitus, type 1 in my case.  I started on insulin that same day with resolution over the next 2 weeks of the fatigue, polyuria, and polydipsia, but the diarrhea which turned out to be caused by diabetic autonomic neuropathy involving the intestinal tract would take another two and a half years to resolve.  With treatment of the diabetes with insulin and improved blood sugar control came the onset of severe and diffuse peripheral neuropathy with pain and numbness over most of my body.  I could not decide which was worse, the whole body pain or the diarrhea up to 20 times per day.  Fortunately, I did not have eye, vascular, or kidney involvement and that remains the case today.  The neuropathic pain gradually resolved over the next year, and the neuropathic numbness gradually went away after 2-3 years.  But, I did want to discuss the difficulty I had with controlling blood sugars while following the recommendations of the ADA (American Diabetes Association).  Ever since I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus in 1998, the ADA has recommended a low fat diet in line with the dietary fat-heart disease hypothesis since heart and vascular disease is the most common cause of death of the diabetic patient.  Specifically, a dietary intake of 50 – 60% of calories from carbohydrates (carbs) has been recommended, some of which may be simple sugars.  In theory, I thought this seemed plausible, since the ADA recommended counting carbohydrate grams in the diet to be balanced with insulin, in my case, or other diabetes medications (for those with type 2 diabetes).  However, after 2 years of weighing my food or otherwise calculating the grams of carbohydrates eaten with each meal, there was no significant improvement in blood sugar control and no improvement in the number or severity of hypoglycemic episodes (low blood sugars).  So, I abandoned the carb counting and just tried to keep the intake of carbs constant with each meal.  At some point along this journey, I heard about the book “Dr Richard Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution”.  I did not read the book at the time, but found out about the “drastic” reduction in carbohydrates in the diet as the main feature of his approach.  The thought of giving up so many foods that I liked did not appeal to me.  I thought the fluctuations in blood sugar, hypoglycemic episodes, and my HgbA1c values of 5.6 to 6.9% were an inevitable part of having diabetes.  In addition, I assumed that if his approach was scientifically based and clinically effective, that the medical authorities (including the ADA – American Diabetes Association) would have also embraced this approach.  But the fact that they did not, added to my reluctance.  Well, I should have looked into that more at the time and actually read his book.  In 2008, the ADA for the first time acknowledged the use of a low carbohydrate approach for the purpose of weight loss in diabetics for up to one year, based on a recent study published in the medical literature.  They did not, and have not, embraced the low carbohydrate diet for all diabetics long term.

In 2007, my wife trained for and did her first triathlon.  I watched her first triathlon race and saw how she and so many others appeared to enjoy it.  I had not exercised on any regular basis since high school and since I had a chronic disease that might be helped with exercise, I decided to give triathlon a try.  I enjoyed the exercise and having a goal to work toward gave me the motivation I needed.  After a few years of increasing the distance of the triathlon events, I contemplated doing the full ironman distance triathlon.  I started looking into how to keep my body fueled and blood sugars near normal for the 12+ hours it might take me to do such a race particularly since sugar is the primary, if not sole, fuel used by athletes during a long distance triathlon.  This is what motivated me to discover the dietary change that I am currently enjoying.

In 2011, I reexamined my diet and studied the Paleo Diet (Loren Cordain, PhD), the low carbohydrate ketogenic diet for diabetes (Richard Bernstein, MD), and the low carbohydrate ketogenic diet for athletes (Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD, Jeff Volek, PhD, RD and Eric Westman, MD).  I have combined portions of both of these diets for myself.  The essence of the low carbohydrate ketogenic approach for diabetes is as follows.  Diabetes is a disease of carbohydrate intolerance.  Carbohydrates in the diet are not essential to the diet, only protein and fat are essential.  Near elimination of carbohydrates from the diet will maximally improve diabetes control, reduce insulin doses needed to control blood sugars in type 1 or insulin dependent type 2 diabetes, and in the case of pre-diabetes or early type 2 diabetes can normalize blood sugars without medications.  See Athletes page for more details.

I transitioned to this low carbohydrate ketogenic diet to address both of my issues, namely diabetes control and fueling endurance exercise with excellent results.  My blood sugars are better controlled and hypoglycemia is quite unusual.  I have had several blood sugar readings in the range of 46 to 60 mg/dl without any symptoms of hypoglycemia.  Readings this low prior to the ketogenic diet would have caused symptoms of hypoglycemia.  On the ketogenic diet, however, these symptoms are absent presumably due to the use of ketones by the body and brain.  I am able to exercise with no apparent loss of energy or power while consuming relatively little sugar during exercise to prevent hypoglycemia.  I measure my blood sugar while exercising usually every 60 – 90 mins or if I feel my blood sugar might be low.  My blood tests have improved in the typical pattern seen on a ketogenic diet. Triglycerides decreased from an average of 76 to 65 mg/dL, HDL cholesterol increased from an average of 61 to 90 mg/dL, the triglyceride/HDL ratio decreased from 1.31 to 0.72, the calculated LDL cholesterol increased from an average of 103 to 162 mg/dL.  The hsCRP (high sensitivity C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation) decreased from 3.2 to 0.7 mg/L.  Of note, in my case, exercise did not result in a significant change in any of these lipid values, nor did niaspan or pravastatin (taken during different time frames).  The niaspan was discontinued 16 months prior to and the pravastatin was discontinued 4.5 months prior to these latest results.  Seeing that this diet actually worked for me and the scientifically proven health benefits of a well formulated low carbohydrate diet for treatment of obesity and numerous chronic diseases, I decided to add nutritional therapy to my medical practice.  In addition to review of books and literature, I am using the resources of the ASBP (American Society of Bariatric Physicians) in preparation for the board certification examination in obesity medicine (by the American Board of Obesity Medicine) in Nov. 2012.

What Does Dr Runyan Eat?
1.  Macronutrient Composition
Protein – about 0.7 grams protein per pound of body weight per day, currently 163 lbs X 0.7 = 114 grams per day.  This is close to what I ate prior to starting a ketogenic low carb diet.  This is in the range recommended for athletes (0.6 to 1.0 grams per pound of body weight per day).  I chose the lower end of this recommended range for two reasons.  First, I am doing endurance exercise rather than body building exercise and therefore need less protein.  Second, too much protein in the diet can interfere with maintaining nutritional ketosis since protein in excess of the body’s needs for production of enzymes, hormones, structural components, etc. can be converted to glucose which in turn would require more injected insulin and suppress fat burning and ketone production.  The protein in my diet comes from grass-fed beef, lamb, and pork (which is higher in omega-3 fatty acids than grain-fed), range-fed chicken, omega-3 enriched eggs (currently not range-fed), cheese (extra sharp cheddar, feta, and cream cheese primarily), fish (primarily wild caught Alaska salmon, but other varieties as well) and shrimp, plain Greek yogurt (10% milk fat), and nuts (primarily macadamia and pistachio).

Carbohydrates – about 40 – 50 grams carbohydrate per day.  I aim for about 30 – 40 grams from my diet, and during long exercise sessions (> 2 hrs) which generally occurs 2 days/week, I may take up to 24 grams of carbohydrate per hour while exercising to prevent hypoglycemia.  Carbohydrates in my diet come from vegetables (kale, collard greens, yellow squash, zucchini squash, brussels sprouts, lettuce, etc), and the small amount of carbohydrates contained in cheese, yogurt, nuts, cream, and 2 tbls lemon juice for salads.  I avoid all grains and foods made from grains, fruits (except tomato and avocado), potatoes, and legumes.  I take sugar (glucose) only to treat hypoglycemia or prevent it during exercise.

Fats – about 230 grams fat per day (about 100 grams saturated fat, 100 grams monounsaturated fat, 30 grams polyunsaturated fat, 6600 mg of omega-3 fatty acids, omega-6/omega-3 ratio of 3.6 to 1, and 600 mg of cholesterol).  Fat in my diet primarily comes from meat, tallow, eggs, fish, cheese, nuts, butter, heavy whipping cream, coconut oil, olives and olive oil.

Totals Calories = (114 grams protein x 4) + (45 grams carbohydrate x 4) + (230 grams fat x 9) = 2700 calories.  From a caloric perspective, 17% of calories come from protein, 7% from carbohydrates, and 76% from fat.

2.  Micronutrient Composition
I used the USDA nutrition data tables primarily to calculate the micronutrient content of my diet.  Using the Recommended Dietary Intake (RDI) values for my sex and age, I compared them to my daily intake.  My diet met or exceeded the RDI values.

3.  Fiber
My daily dietary fiber intake is about 18 grams/day, which is less than the recommended 30 grams/day.  This recommended figure is based on the belief that dietary fiber will prevent colon cancer.  I believe that colon cancer is not causally related to dietary fiber, but more related to a carbohydrate predominate diet since colon cancer is one of the many diseases of Western civilization.

In summary, I have combined most of the tenets from the Paleo Diet as outlined by Loren Cordain, PhD (except for the use of some dairy products, inclusion of more fat, exclusion of fruit) with a ketogenic low carbohydrate approach as detailed by Richard Bernstein, MD which I believe is optimal for those with diabetes.  This lifestyle has resulted in the best control of my diabetes to date and has the potential to minimize the many complications of diabetes.

Keith R. Runyan, MD
6499 38th Ave N., Suite C-1
St. Petersburg, FL   33706
Phone (727)345-3908

 

Foods to Choose – My Recommended Food List

Depending on what your family health history looks like, I would recommend some of the following foods. For those of us who live with an auto-immune disease, it gets a little more restrictive. No doubt though, there is still plenty of good food to be had. Have any questions? Please comment. Cheers to you and good health.

Overall recommended guidelines:

1.  Eat relatively high amount of animal protein compared to that of the typical American diet
2.  Eat carbohydrates only coming from fruits, starchy tubers (sweet potato, yams) and vegetables. Avoid grains and refined sugars.
3.  Eat a large amount of fiber from non-starchy fruits and vegetables.
4.  Eat a moderate amount of healthy fat from avocado, grass fed meat, coconut oil, olive oil (not at high heat), etc
5.  Eat foods rich in plant phytochemicals, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants

Recommended Foods:

  • Meats and poultry – important to be free range/grass fed
  • Beef
  • Lamb
  • Pork
  • Chicken
  • Turkey
  • Duck
  • Rabbit
  • Quail
  • Venison
  • Seafood
  • Bacon, bio-dynamic preferred and nitrate free
  • Eggs (pasture-raised, local, organic, free range and/or omega 3) no limit on how many per week
  • Olives
  • Ham, nitrate free and sugar free
  • Salami, uncured
  • Butter or ghee, from grass feed cows
  • Pickled foods
  • Fermented foods
  • Smoked, dried and salted fish & meat
  • Palm oil
  • Sesame oil
  • Macadamia oil
  • Olive oil
  • Tea
  • Almonds
  • Walnuts
  • Brazil nuts
  • Cashews
  • Hazelnuts
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Macadamia nut oil
  • Pecans
  • Pine nuts
  • Pistachios (unsalted)
  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Sesame seeds
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Hemp hearts (hemp seeds)
  • Almond milk
  • Coconut milk and cream
  • Almond flour
  • Coconut flour
  • Coconut oil
  • Cocoa powder
  • Cocoa nibs
  • Carob powder
  • Dark chocolate, 80% or greater
  • Tomatoes
  • Watermelon
  • Bananas
  • Sweet potatoes, yams
  • Pumpkin, squash, acorn, butternut
  • Spaghetti squash, Zucchini
  • Spinach
  • Fennel
  • Lettuce
  • Leeks
  • Capsicums/Bell peppers
  • Lettuce
  • Kale
  • Brussel sprouts
  • Cucumber
  • Celery
  • Radish
  • Seaweed
  • Watercress
  • Cauliflower
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Eggplant
  • Asparagus
  • Artichoke
  • Parsnip
  • Broccoli
  • Mushrooms
  • Onions
  • Beets
  • Buk Choy
  • Bone broth (homemade)
  • Black rice
  • Quinoa
  • Herbs and spices
  • Red wine

 

Best fruits:

  • Avocados
  • Blackberries
  • Blueberries
  • Cherries
  • Lemon
  • Raspberries
  • Strawberries

Fruits still okay (limit to 1 or less per day):

  • Grapes
  • Passion fruit
  • Pineapple
  • Apples
  • Apricots
  • Cantaloupe
  • Cranberries
  • Figs
  • Grapefruit
  • Honeydew melon
  • Kiwi
  • Lime
  • Mango
  • Nectarine
  • Orange
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Plums
  • Pomegranat

FAQ – Breastfeeding & (Paleo) Diet Change

If you are a new mother, breastfeeding and wanting to shed some weight, you may enjoy this common FAQ. If you have any experiences to add, please comment; we would love to hear from you.

My sweet nephew Beau

Client FAQ:

“I’m looking to jump start losing the rest of my baby weight and was thinking of going paleo, as I have before with significant other. However, I do have some concerns about changing my diet THAT much since I am breastfeeding. My question is: do you have any info on the affects of paleo while breastfeeding? Is there a way to ease into it so that it won’t affect my milk supply? Any info you can find would be so helpful.”

Answer:

While my response is not black and white everyone, hence I do not know exactly what foods are currently being consumed, I believe it is advisable and surely should not negatively impact milk supply switching to a whole food diet, such as a paleo diet. Yet, it is crucial to keep calories adequate. With breastfeeding calorie needs can increase by 200-500 calories. Keeping hydration up is almost, if not more important too. Drink that H2O.

While I am not yet a mother, there are testimonials of moms who have breastfeed their children on both a paleo diet and a Standard American Diets and have found these observations:

  • Paleo breastfeed babies (meaning mother ate a paleo diet) had better sleep, fewer spit ups, less gas and few to no rashes on the bum or face.

Of course this is not scientific data, and all babies are different, but do a Google search and see what you find. I think there is some truth in the consistency of the above noted trends.

Overall, making the change to paleo or to a cleaner diet, you need support. Whether it’s your significant other helping you, family or frineds, I too am happy to coach you along. Please don’t hesistate to ask.

Hands down, you are a wonder woman. Having a baby is not a piece of cake and these breastfeeding months are not a bed of roses either. Changing a diet, and setting standards for yourself can be stressful. Go at a pace of making change that works for you and if you slip-up, no stress. There is tomorrow and the next, wide open for you to be successful with this goal.

Overall some suggestions of transitioning to a paleo diet is to be sure to get good fats (coconut oil, avocado, grass fed butter, etc) in along with some solid protein sources, such as wild fish, grass fed meat, free range, organic eggs. Fill up on vegetables and some fruit. The amount of fat recommended is likely more than you have been eating. Do not be afraid of fat  it is good for you, good for weight loss and good for your baby.

Cheers to you and good health,

Kel

 

Corn Syrup in Soy Sauce?!

Getting comfortable upon our return to the US, post living in Australia for two years, I cannot help but find myself feeling “culture shock.” Maybe, “food shock” is a better term.

No doubt, I love America and the lifestyle it offers, yet, since being accustomed to daily food markets, butchers with fresh, free range meat and eggs, it is overwhelming walking into a Giant Eagle, let alone Costco these last few days.

Goodness, I bet my bank account I found a kiwi in Costco the size of a mango. How is this natural? And wow, I could literally get any cuisine I wanted in one store, regardless of the season. They had seaweed salad in Ohio! I mean this is great, but is it that great? The salad was delish but after reading the food ingredients, it lost it’s appeal seeing there were at least 3 food coloring’s in it. Why would my seaweed need to be more green? I wish we had an option.

And whereas it’s lovely to get any ingredient you want, it makes it tough to know what is truly in season. In Australia I literally bought produce by the season and made recipes accordingly. I remember one day I wanted red grapes (out of season) and the supermarket clerk looked at me like I had two heads.

Also, whilst visiting with family, my mom asked I help point out some healthier choices for her to eat/prepare for meals and I was/am more than keen to do so. This morning I began helping her by proofing her cabinet and found science experiments of ingredients. What do I mean? Some of the items in the pantry would never pass as food if it weren’t for the label or food container. I nearly fell over when I saw corn syrup in soy sauce! Why? I mean really, why? I know corn is cheap and before you know it, it is going to be found in our chewing gum. Oh wait…

I am probably coming off in this post as harsh, but the point I want to make is it’s not anyone’s fault for not knowing what is best for them to eat or feed their family with. There are so so so many mixed messages in the media and heaps of information to sort through. Most recently I had forgotten how hard marketing makes it on the regular consumer in knowing what foods to choose for health.  If you need some clarifying, I am happy to help. Send me an email and I will do my best to reply within 48 hours.

A pointer to start you off with is a line by Michael Pollan, “Eat food. Not too much. Most plants.” And sure as heck eat real butter!

Cheers to you and good health,

Kel

Client FAQ – Rice

I had a question – I saw on your latest post that one of the foods you eat is white rice. I thought brown rice is better for you?

The difference between brown and white rice is minimal but big enough to make a fuss over. On the outside looking in, brown rice’s nutrient profile looks better (fiber, etc) but brown rice more antinutrients, which come from the bran and germ part of the seed.

If you are aware of the process of how white rice is made, the bran and germ is mostly removed, making it a less allergenic food source. According to the Weston A. Price Foundation, approximately 84-99% of the dry weight of brown rice is phytic acid. This is where white rice measures up more in our favor. Bottom line, if you are looking for nutritious food seek out ingredients, produce, protein that are more dense in vitamins and minerals per calorie. Nonetheless, rice can be a good vehicle for healthy fats such as ghee, butter and/or coconut oil and above all, if you do not need the carbs, opt for cauliflower rice.

For more reading on antinutrients, check out a post on Marks Blog by clicking here.

Cheers to you and good health,

Kel