To Lose the Booze

“Why on earth should I try to be more dry?” said this chick who was the social chair in college, who started a wine club in our neighborhood last year and not long ago I had ambitions to become a sommelier. In fact, a few of my favorite memories exist in Australia’s wine country when we lived there in 2011.

If I suggested this even a year ago, it would be blasphemy. I remember attempting a sober month with my husband in February (yes, the shortest month of the year) and I felt like it was silly as I have a number of other restrictions in my life as someone with an autoimmune disease, type 1 diabetes, where I fair best on a low carbohydrate diet, thus a gluten and dairy-free diet. Take away my wine? Crazy!

But after being a little more sober curious about it, I’ve come to realize, drinking less alcohol is actually a very powerful way to practice self-care with respect to my personal growth, business goals, and health. So in the end, there are few cons with less alcohol in my life.

Replacing the time and money I would put into wine, etc, I will repurpose my energy to do better things. Explore why you can view social drinking in a new light and moderate your drinks to serve you. Life is about pleasure and perhaps sobriety isn’t the need, but is less in fact more?

I won’t list scare tactics on alcohol, yet, I will recommend having fun with this alcohol money tracker, from finder.com. It’s quite an eye-opening calculator and perhaps inspiring. 

 

From type 1 to type none: Woman raises funds to help those living with diabetes

PUBLISHED: 

Kelly Schmidt is working to fundraise for a purpose.

“I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes on my 8th birthday in second grade,” she told 10TV’s Angela An.

That was in 1991, when according to Kelly’s website, she learned the power of “food is thy medicine.”

But it wasn’t until Kelly’s senior year in high school when she says she found a new purpose: to make living with type 1 diabetes better for everyone affected by the disease. She is now a registered dietitian, speaker, author, and wellness coach.

Her goal is to guide clients with type 1 diabetes on how to live a life where diabetes is less hard.

She is hosting an invite-only pig roast she hopes to turn into a mini-fundraiser “to make this disease less hard and nonexistent.”

Kelly, who is also a JDRF Board member, said this is not just a mission for her — Kelly’s father also has type 1 diabetes.

JDRF Central Ohio will also hold it’s annual One Walk on Sunday, Sept. 29 at the CAS campus at 2540 Olentangy River Road. Check in begins at 9 a.m. with the one-mile walk starting at 10:30 a.m.

The goal of the event is to raise more than $600,000 for juvenile diabetes research.

Fiance’s Making Health Happen

REGARDLESS OF AN INJURY OR CELIAC/GLUTEN ALLERGY

I’ve been working with David, then Stacey for the last year and I believe we can all benefit from their health story and ongoing journey. Enjoy!

Hi! I’m Stacey Jones (S), a smiling 40-year-old, with a history of celiac disses (diagnosed in 2015) and bottomless relationship with dieting since my teens. I spend my daytime hours working from home, aka access to the kitchen whenever I want it, for a higher education technology company, and a year ago, I took the leap, I choose me and found I was ready for true change and sought help from a professional, Kelly.

Hello, my name is David Ward (D), I’m 40 years old as well. I spend most of my time during the day as a service delivery manager of an IT company and serve in the Ohio Army National Guard. Growing up I was made to eat everything on my plate. My mother God bless her, cooked like she was feeding a platoon when was just me and my brother. I continued this eating habit into adulthood.

How has your health goal evolved with your work with Kelly? 

S: A year before I actually worked with Kelly, I bought supplements from Kelly (I highly recommend doing a detox, while it’s hard, it’s very helpful). After seeing the success David was having working with Kelly, I knew there was something to explore. 

My starting goal was to focus on losing belly fat and while it hasn’t necessarily changed, because it’s the most inflammatory place to hold extra weight, I have a more whole-body focus now. I used to just focus on calories and portions, I have broadened my scope much wider. I listen to hunger cues, manipulate my hunger with balanced meals, fasting, etc, exercise, giving myself grace, and work on the negative self-talk I’ve had for years around food.

D: I started with Kelly because I needed help in losing/maintaining my weight to stay within Army standards as I was unable to workout due to a herniated disc in October 2018. I wanted to change my eating habits and needed guidance on how to do it beyond a dieting/deprivation mindset. Now my goal is to maintain the level of wellness and lean body mass I’ve achieved and the healthy habits I learned so far. When I started this journey to a better life, my weight was 230 lbs. at 29 percent body fat, now I’m at 210 lbs. and I’m at 21 percent. Thanks, Kelly!

What is one lesson from Kelly’s work that has had a large impact on your progress and worth sharing with others?

S: Give yourself grace instead of shaming yourself. This was and is HUGE for me.

D: Recognize when I’m full, in the past I would eat so fast that I didn’t give my body time to let me know that I was full. Now I purposely slow down and enjoy my food, and when I’m full I’m done eating.

What is your outlook on your health now compared to the start?  

S: I can figure it out if I just don’t quit. In fact, this is almost an affirmation I keep in mind daily. I can lose weight without having to count a single calorie (because we all grow up thinking you HAVE to count calories) and enjoy the process as well.

D: I never thought I would be at the weight I’m at now, I am 50 pounds less than my senior year of high school weight. After years of struggling, I would see improvement but gain the weight back. Now I live a more healthy lifestyle without even trying, having regular monthly meetings with Kelly has kept me accountable. Side note, I still find enjoyment when I go out to eat and want to have alcohol. I have found a balance with Kelly, which are fueling my results. 

What is one habit that you’ve adopted that is helping your progress?  

S: Intermittent fasting, balancing meals with fat, protein and complex carbs, thinking about insulin response from food and sugar, and having confidence I can continue on this path.

D: Intermediate fasting and initially counting macros, also knowing I’m not starving myself to lose weight. It’s ironic how helpful it is to hydrate properly. Thirst is often mistaken for hunger.

What advice would you give someone else who wants to lose weight and become healthier?  

S: It’s all about making small changes that add up to big changes in the long run.  And meeting yourself where you are at.

D: I recommend anyone who is struggling like I was, to take the time and get the help, there’s more to living a healthy lifestyle than going to the gym. Having someone to talk about your health needs and being able to coach you to not only meet your goals but maintain them is essential.

 

7 Risks of Prolonged Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance refers to a condition in which cells in the body no longer respond properly to insulin. This has a huge impact on health because of the role that this anabolic hormone plays in glucose metabolism. With insulin resistance, cells, including those in the liver and body fat, begin to ‘resist’ signals sent by insulin. This means that they stop absorbing glucose from the blood to use it as the main fuel source. As a result, blood sugar levels start to rise, causing a variety of health risks, the best known of which is diabetes. However, failing to manage the condition effectively can do more damage than you realize. Here are some of the major risks of prolonged insulin resistance.

  1. Type 2 Diabetes

The pancreas which produces insulin, respond to resistance by increasing production of the hormone. With prolonged insulin resistance, the amount of insulin needed to regulate blood sugar levels keeps rising. In time, the pancreas suffers from fatigue and cannot meet the demands for insulin. This leads to the onset of prediabetes and diabetes. Insulin resistance is regarded as a major predictor of type-2 diabetes, with most patients going on to develop the condition within the next 10-20 years.

  1. High Cholesterol

In many cases, prolonged insulin resistance makes you more likely to develop high cholesterol levels. More specifically, it alters systemic lipid metabolism, resulting in higher than normal levels of plasma triglycerides, while levels of high-density lipoprotein (the good cholesterol) start to fall. The increase in blood cholesterol levels that is commonly observed with insulin resistance may be caused by increased synthesis of very-low-density lipoprotein in the liver.

  1. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Although the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease can have various causes, such as a high-fat diet and obesity, insulin resistance is regarded as an important contributor. The condition can increase fat accumulation in the liver by increasing the delivery of free fatty acid and through hyperinsulinemia – increased insulin production. In fact, insulin resistance is observed in almost all cases of fatty liver disease. In some cases, this can even lead to the development of steatohepatitis.

  1. You develop dark skin patches

Prolonged insulin resistance leads to an increase in insulin production over time and this can cause an accumulation of insulin within skin cells themselves. This manifests in visible skin changes, with darkened patches of skin towards the back of the neck, elbows, knees, groins, knuckles, and armpits. This skin condition is described as acanthosis nigricans. There is no known cure for the condition, but the management of insulin resistance can help to prevent it or reduce the severity of discoloration and darkening.

  1. Heart Attack & Stroke

When not managed in a timely manner, insulin resistance can significantly raise the risk of heart failure and strokes. Aside from the fact that reduced insulin sensitivity and increased blood sugar damages cells, including blood vessels, insulin resistance also adversely affects lipid levels. All of this encourages the buildup of arterial plaque, restricting or even obstructing blood flow. In time, this damages the heart itself. Not surprisingly, insulin resistance is associated with a 50% higher risk of heart failure and strokes.

  1. Cancerous Tumors

Cancer is not something that most of us associated with insulin resistance, but research suggests that there may be a connection. Prolonged insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome may increase the risk of various types of cancer, including breast, bladder, colon, pancreatic, and uterine cancers. It is believed that high insulin levels facilitate tumor growth and also impair the body’s natural defense against malignant cells.

  1. Early Onset Dementia

Although the connection between prolonged insulin resistance and dementia is not clearly understood, studies do suggest that insulin resistance raises the risk. One mechanism is vascular dementia, in which blood vessel damage from insulin resistance leads to reduced blood flow to the brain. Researchers are still investigating the role of insulin resistance in memory function decline and the increased risk of conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease.

 

How to Cope with Insulin Resistance

In addition to the risks highlighted above, insulin resistance is also connected to a higher risk of kidney disease, high uric acid levels or gout, and PCOS. Fortunately, effective and early management of insulin resistance can counter these risks. Dietary and lifestyle changes to lose weight and get better sleep can help improve insulin sensitivity significantly. In fact, a study that appeared in the International Journal of Obesity, found that 10% of weight loss through diet and exercise could improve insulin sensitivity by 80%. Similarly, sleep deprivation has also been shown to raise insulin resistance. Findings like these highlight the importance of comprehensive lifestyle changes to tackle insulin resistance.

My Daily Health Hacks

What Hacks Do You Use?
A study examining the various things Americans do to feel healthy found the average person attempts six “hacks” a week to boost their health and save time.

  • As a type 1, I supplement strategically with methylated B vitamins, CBD, probiotics, turmeric, fish oil, to name a few.
  • I drink ACV water before bed to improve my fasting blood sugar/gut health
  • I keep monthly notes on my phone for my cycle so I can best prepare for insulin changes and cravings.
  • Morning routine – I wake up before my kids.
  • I use a standup working desk
  • I bounce on a trampoline 3-5 minutes, most days – good for lymph, detox, immunity, and stress.
  • I eat 4-6 cups of vegetables a day.
  • I practice gratitude nightly before I fall asleep.
  • I eat mindfully, paying close attention to what (real food) my body wants and when it starts to feel satisfied.
  • I minimize snacking.
  • I pack my meals for road trips.
  • We use blackout curtains, low temperatures, and an eye mask for high-quality sleep.
  • I have and keep an organized kitchen.
  • I drink decaf coffee and matcha to keep my caffeine in check
  • I pamper myself monthly – from nails, girl night’s out, massage.
  • I read ~3 books a month.
  • I sleep with my phone in airplane mode (but I keep my Bluetooth on to stay connected to my Dexcom)
  • I immediately chop after I grocery shop – to have large salads and roasted veggies ready to go for future meals.
  • I do some form of a detox 4x a year
  • I keep the healthiest food options at eye level in the pantry and fridge.
  • I eat chocolate.
  • I schedule my workouts like a meeting; always showing up.
  • I time block projects to be more efficient with my time, aka stress level.
  • I shop on Thrive Market to save time (esp researching products) and money.
  • I have a water intake goal every day to improve my insulin efficiency, blood sugar control, and appetite.
  • I intermittent fast nearly every day. The summer my fasts are shorter.
  • We go camping multiple times a year. I certainly prefer glamping, but the grounding and gratitude that comes from nature are undeniable.
  • I periodically (depending on the season I am in) track my food to make sure I have tabs on my portions. I have the appetite of a teenage boy.
  • I get outside every day, no matter what.
  • If you are not cheating, you are not trying. I am kinda kidding, kinda not. But I will buy pre-riced cauliflower, salad kits, a premade meal when time is a priority over cost.
  • I throw money at the problem. I have this awesome workout app – and I may use it 1x a week. I purchase a year membership to the local yoga studio, I workout 500% more. I am a fan of throwing money at the problem of whatever hurdle I am trying to overcome.
  • I (try to) eat without distractions to ensure I am eating the amounts my appetite calls for.
  • I use a low carb diet to control my appetite and diabetes.
  • I walk/bike EVERY time I need to go somewhere and it’s within walking or biking distance.
  • I batch and prep meals ahead of time for the week. I also pack my kids lunches the night before to make the mornings go more smoothly.
  • I moderate my alcohol by only enjoying it on the weekends. I love being productive and wine during the week slows me down. Well, all wine with the exception of Dry Farm Wine.
  • drink mixed greens every afternoon to increase my nutrient intake.

Affirmations & Weight Loss – The Power of Positivity

Affirmations and Weight-loss - KSW - #weightlosstips #weightlossfacts #nutritionisttips #nutritionfacts #nutritiontips #healthylifestyletips #positivemindset #KSW #kellyschmidt #weightloss #howtoloseweight #mindsetiskey
Infographic designed and edited by Tayler Silfverduk, DTR

While we think our actions create our results, it’s really the thoughts we manage and create that lead us feeling a certain way, priming us to make certain choices and actions, therefore our results.

Our thoughts create our results.

How and what we think is a crucial element to our health and fat loss journey. This is why when I work with clients who want to lose weight, we spend time on the topic of affirmations.

Affirmations:  a statement about ourselves or our situation that’s phrased in the present tense as if the self-focused declaration is already true.

If you read them on a continual basis and stay persistent, combining them with regular physical activities and a real food diet, I guarantee that you WILL achieve your desired results. Pick an affirmation and own it for the next 30 days and see what happens,

Examples of weight loss and confidence affirmations to adopt:

  • I reached my weight loss goal.
  • My past doesn’t defy my future. I am achieving my goals.
  • Age has nothing to do with it. I am releasing this weight in a wise way.
  • I am taking care of myself.
  • I am so happy and grateful I weigh _________.
  • I feel hunger without fear, in fact, I appreciate it.
  • I eat just enough, without overeating.
  • I am showing up for myself and treating myself with respect.
  • I am grateful for my body and where it takes me.
  • I am proving my ability to change my habits and adopt new ones.
  • I am worthy.
  • I am enough.
  • I trust my body and it’s capabilities to heal and thrive.
  • I inhale life and exhale anxiety.
  • I am flexible to change.

How to Use Affirmations

Say them daily, aloud, for a larger impact. Repeat them 1-5x a day, and put them in your calendar, like a post-it on your mirror, in your pantry, on your desk and computer, and say the chosen affirmation with belief.

Our brain doesn’t know reality. It knows what our thoughts tell it, and an affirmation is an easy way to “fake it until I make it,” progressing to the results you want.

3 Vital Methods of Improving You Heart Health

Each of us only gets one heart during the course of our lives. While there are extensive medical treatments that can support or potentially replace your heart problems, prevention is always worth plenty more in its curative potential. Improving heart health isn’t usually a singular act, the same as any other matter of health. However, with a little care and consideration, you can drastically reduce the statistical likelihood of contracting various ailments. Thankfully, you needn’t climb a mountain every day or find the strangest and most exotic solutions to improve your health in this manner.

This process can be relatively easy, provided you keep at it, prioritize this as something to take care of, and look to find what works for you. With the following tips, we’re certain you’ll get there with promising results:

Exercise

Without exercise, it is often extremely easy for your cardiovascular strength to suffer.  While the fit and healthy lifestyle is 20% exercise and 80% diet, that 20% is more essential than you might know.  Exercise trains your heart to be stronger, to deal with stress easier, to lower your resting heart rate, and to improve blood oxygen levels.  

Exercise can also help sleep, keep you disciplined which translates to diet positivity, it helps you keep a healthy weight, and decreases the effects of cardiovascular disease.  While exercise might differ depending on your needs, and while requirements might change depending on your age, weight, training aptitude, and medical needs, even professional cardiology services, with their range of offerings will often cite exercise as one of the most important things to take care of.

Stress

Lowering stress levels can lower your cortisol, which often contributes to a higher resting heart rate, strain on your heart and the intensity of panicked states.  It could be that applying meditation, lowering your working hours and filtering the chaos from your normal life could help you here significantly.

Stress can be mitigated through proper use of breathing techniques, exercise, correct sleep, social support, but sometimes targeted medication.  Be sure to speak with your healthcare professional about your own needs here.

Sleep

Sleep is one of the most restorative natural activities we all must take part in.  It is the nightly mercy to refresh your mind, body and spirit. It also helps your heart lower its necessary BPM while your other organs are taken care of.  Sleep reduces stress, gives you more energy, and nourishes you. A distinct lack of this can put a severe strain on your heart, and longer-term lack of sleep can often result in a lower lifespan.  Sleep is the most necessary, important part of this list and is worth taking care of.

With these tips you are sure to benefit deeply from a renewed a heart health priority. After all, you deserve to live your healthiest life. Just remain sure that any help you ever implement is always verified by your healthcare practitioner.

 

Why You Are Struggling With Weight Loss

Weight loss is a hot topic this time of year. Along with melting fat, women more so are looking to get lean! Which we absolutely love. As well, weight loss doesn’t always have to mean losing the pounds, it can mean swapping them for inches so do not obsess over the number on the scale. 

Yet weight loss and fat loss is easier said than done. It doesn’t just take hard work, it takes a plan and strategy. Keep reading to discover how you can make the struggle with weight loss much easier!

You’re Trying The Wrong Diets

If you’re going to try and lose weight, you’re going to have to think about some sort of routine. Even if that means simply cutting out fatty foods that are high in sugar and salt, and swapping them for something a bit greener and leaner. That can be classed as a diet, you don’t have to follow some of the crazy crazes that there are out there. But if you’re going to, there are some that will work better, and quicker than others. The keto diet is one of them, and thousands of people around the world are on the diet right now. Ketogenic diet foods are easy to come by, so it’s not like this fancy diet is going to cost you a fortune. The diet works by reducing carbs to pretty much nothing, if not cutting them all out. This then encourages the liver to produce ketones which are then used as an energy source, these then break down fats. Once you reach an optimal weight, you then really slowly introduce foods higher in carbs, but still, stick to a whole real food diet!

Cheat Days Aren’t Banned

Cheat days definitely aren’t banned. The reason we feel that so many people fail when on a diet, is because they restrict themselves so much. It’s salads and fruits all the way, leaving your body to heavily crave the things you used to feed it with so much. This leads to massive binges on junk food, and it halts any weight loss progress. So, make every day a cheat day, and pick one item to have. A chocolate bar, a bag of crisps, whatever it may be. All you have to do is make sure you’re having one thing in terms of your cheat… and no that does not mean a massive Dairy Milk chocolate bar counts as one. That way, you always have a little treat to look forward to, and won’t feel the need to snack constantly.

Weight Loss Hints for a Healthier You

When you improve your health and well-being, weight loss is often a byproduct. Consider what it takes to look after yourself and try to become healthier in everyday life.

There are various ways to improve your lifestyle, and your health and fitness. These are some of the best ways of keeping yourself in good shape as much as you can.

  • Drink More Water

Drinking more water is absolutely essential when it comes to keeping you hydrated and nourished. If you are serious about becoming healthier and boosting your fitness and well-being, you need to make sure you are drinking more water. There is a lot to keep in mind when it comes how much water you drink, and the accepted amount that you should be drinking is considered to be between 2 and 3 litres. Make sure you come up with plenty of great ideas to help you get into a routine of drinking more water right now.

  • Take up Fitness Classes

Another way of keeping yourself in top condition is to make sure you take up fitness classes. You need to stay in shape and do as much as possible to exercise on a regular basis. This is one of the reasons why a weight loss studio for women is one of the best ways of making sure you stay in shape and keep active. Fitness classes are so important, and they play a major role in the process of boosting fitness and staying healthy as much as possible.

  • Change Your Diet

Make sure you look at what you can do to change your diet and improve your diet. There are a lot of different diets that you could adopt, but it is also essential to make sure you have a balanced diet, focusing on real food and ensure you are tapping into your hunger to eat the right amounts. Making changes to your diet plays a massive part in the process of staying healthy. What’s my biggest tip? Avoid sugar and flour and do not view food as entertainment. Food is fuel. 

  • Kick the Habit

Everyone has bad habits that can affect their health in a negative sense, and you need to make sure you look at how you can kick such obstacles getting in your way.  Cut down on your drinking as much as possible.

There are a lot of things that have to happen if you want to be able to lose weight and stay in good shape. In fact, gaining or losing weight is a combination of small factors. Make small adjustments to your lifestyle and the accumulation of positive change will help you succeed. It’s not always what we are eating. It’s often what is eating us.

5 Red Flags You Are Eating Too Much Sugar

Did you know there are ~20 grams of sugar in a bowl of tomato soup? The daily recommended limit when it comes to sugar is 30 grams. If you pair your soup with a salad, which the salad dressing either has dried fruit in it or a dressing with sugar, honey or syrup in it, you’ve likely blown the budget in one meal.

Many foods have hidden sugars in, so it can be difficult to know how much you’re consuming. However, various health problems can usually serve as an indicator that you’re consuming too much sugar including the following. 

Tooth decay

Tooth decay is the most obvious sign excess sugar in the diet (or it could be insulin resistance/inflammation) – or that you’re not brushing your teeth thoroughly enough. Sugar provides the perfect breeding ground for enamel-eating bacteria, which leads to cavities. Rigorous brushing can stop sugar rotting the teeth – it could be worth taking a visit to your local dental office to get your teeth professionally cleaned to prevent any current cavities from getting worse. Of course, assessing your diet with a food journal or support of a dietitian can make an impact.

Spots/acne

Whilst acne can be a genetic condition, a number of other factors can also come into play such as personal cleanliness and diet. Sugar causes our bodies to produce more insulin, which in turn can cause unnecessary inflammation around the body such as acne on the skin. If you suffer from acne, it could be worth reducing your sugar and increasing your water. Unrelated to what we eat, stress can do funny things to our body, including blemishes. Make sure you are taking many deep breaths throughout the day and finding an outlet to unwind. 

Excess weight

Sugar can lead to weight gain. Whilst sugar is low in calories, it is a carbohydrate – carbs have the biggest impact on blood sugar and insulin. When blood sugars are moving up and down, it will lead to weight gain and fluctuations in appetite. If you’re overweight and you eat lots of sugary foods, you may want to consider lowering your intake to help lose weight. The only time you may want to up your sugar intake is when doing aerobic exercise as sugar can provide useful energy to burn off – otherwise, you should keep it to a minimum.

Lack of energy

Relating to weight gain, sugar can cause a sense of an energy boost, but this is only short-term. The more sugar you feast on in one sitting, the bigger the comedown. If you feel tired all the time and you’re getting enough sleep at night, you may want to consider your sugar intake and evaluating how much caffeine you are running on.

High blood pressure

Salt is often blamed as the cause of high blood pressure (it actually only affects 20% of people), but sugar is the bigger villain. Sugar releases insulin, which in turn cause the blood pressure to rise. Constant high blood pressure can take a strain on the heart and arteries leading to potentially lethal problems such as strokes and heart attacks. If you’ve got high blood pressure, try lowering your sugar intake to see if this helps return your pressure to a normal level.