Time to Log My Food Intake

Guess what I did this morning? I hopped on the scale, and, as suspected was not pleased with the number I saw. Most definately though, weight does not define who we are and the number onthe scale does not tell a full story. There are other measures to take into consideration when assessing your weight/composition. However, I know I have been much more stressed in the last 8 months, than I think ever in my life and I have been getting a little too comfortable with winter laziness and meals. Perfection is not the goal, but I want to weigh in a little lighter and feel more energetic as the season turns.  

So what is my plan? I will note my daily food intake and assess if it is enough nutrition for my needs. I also want to step up my movement, while keeping a nice variety of strength training, high intense cardio and low intense excercise (i.e. walking!). I will intend to take one day at a time and reassess in 4 weeks. Until then, have a look at what I ate yesterday.

Breakfast: 2 eggs, sliced button mushrooms and 1 large piece of free-range pork bacon. English breakfast tea and then a coffee at the office, which I regretted come bedtime.

Lunch: headed to a local cafe with my co-worker and had pan-fried white fish and Caesar salad.

Snack: 1 fresh date. I LOVE dates.

Dinner: lemon butter, baked fish with sweet potato.

Snack: coconut yogurt with seed mix (chia seeds, flax seeds, pumpkin seeds) and cocoa nibs.

Monday Movers – Journaling

If you frequent my site, you may be aware of some of the food logs I have posted, predominately in the beginning of 2012. Since sharing my meals on my blog, I often track my food intake and health goals with traditional pencil and paper. What have I realized with both methods? Keeping track of what I eat is a SUPER easy way to stay motivated and it facilitates making the right health decisions.

The best thing about a diary is it does not have to be all about what you eat. Just logging some personal thoughts can go a long way. As mentioned above, I make weekly goals and write them down – if I do not write them down, I find I do not stick to them. Certainly I have learned to phrase my goals in a positive light as self-talk is nearly as important as laying out a personal goal. For example instead of saying, “do not eat nuts this week,” I phrase the goal to say, “seek out meals and snacks that include good protein, vegetables, fruit and good fats.” Other things I jot down include intentions to do some fitness classes during the week or no caffeine for better sleep on school nights.

The benefits of keeping a journal are extensive and can include the following:

–        May help with self-intuition and stress management.

–        You may realize that some of your staple snacks/meals may not be making you feel your best. I just realized this with nuts. I love macadamia nuts but lately I have been making my way around them and found I feel better and have more stable blood sugars.

–        It can help build self-esteem. Once you make goals or write down anything you have overcome, it is as if you are patting yourself on your own back. Start with small goals and slowly make bigger ones, week by week.

–        May help keep optimal health in check. Whether you are looking after your weight or nutrient consumption, logging information is making you attentive and cautious of what you want.

–        If you decide to jot down some notes in a journal or on some scrap paper, make sure you do not stress over keeping a perfect record. This diary is to help you, not to fuel more strain.

What weekly goals do you intend to make for yourself? Do you have any good experiences with journaling?

Cheers to you and good health,


Does Eating More Frequent Meals Really Rev Up Your Metabolism?

You’ve probably heard that eating smaller meals, several times a day will stimulate your metabolism, and keep it revved to burn more calories throughout your day.

The New York Times points out that although some studies have found modest health benefits to eating smaller meals, the research usually involved extremes.

Many weight-loss books and fad diets claim six meals a day is a more realistic approach.

But will it really make a difference?

The New York Times states:

“As long as total caloric and nutrient intake stays the same, then metabolism, at the end of the day, should stay the same as well. One study that carefully demonstrated this, published in 2009 in The British Journal of Nutrition, involved groups of overweight men and women who were randomly assigned to very strict low-calorie diets and followed for eight weeks. Each subject consumed the same number of calories per day, but one group took in three meals a day and the other six.

Both groups lost significant and equivalent amounts of weight. There was no difference between them in fat loss, appetite control or measurements of hormones that signal hunger and satiety. Other studies have had similar results.”

Exercise, on the other hand, seems to effectively increase metabolism according to studies.


The British Journal of Nutrition November 30, 2009; 1-4. [Epub ahead of print]

Original posting click here