My 21 Day Cleanse

Dear Blog,

Or should I say mom and sister (aka sista)? Maybe I have a few more readers than that… 🙂

In this write-up I am sharing how I went about my first 21 Day Standard Process detox. This is a first for me, as I have never bought into the idea of a cleanse and have opted instead to eat a pure, clean diet (sans gluten, dairy, corn, soy, most grains, minimal legumes, etc) that supports my detox pathways and health. However, I felt it was time. Our environment is filled with toxins, and let’s be honest, I have had my fair share of wine. So I have set out to prep and learn what this detox could do for me; and more information below if you are interested in doing a program like such in January 2017.


My biggest worries:

  • how hard would it be to stay compliant,
  • how much time it would take to plan for my meals,
  • how tired am I going to feel? I already have 2 little ones, a husband that travels a lot, and run my own nutrition practice. Am I able to keep up? (Yes! I am determined!)
  • No coffee!! Maybe avoid me for a few days!
  • More than coffee, I think I will terribly miss my eggs. But my focus is looking at all the foods I can eat.
  • Oh! And I am doing this in December. There are social events galore! But this year, I am determined to make December my healthiest month.

How I have prepped:

  • I organized my supplements for the detox
  • I read the handbook on the program. The gist is the first 10 days are meatless, day 11 I can include fish, lean meats (no pork) 2-4x a day, and the entire program has a set routine of 2-3 shakes (and meals), vegetables 2x as much as fruit, no nuts, some seeds, healthy oils, no dairy or gluten, and 1/2 cup of lentils, peas or quinoa 1x a day and supplements. I am excited to try new vegetables or way of spicing them/cooking them.
  • I also familiarized myself with the grocery list and ensure I had enough ingredients on stock. While it’s super beneficial to have a clean cut meal plan, I am somewhat of a rebel and don’t plan to follow it in it’s entirety. I will stick to the allowed foods, no doubt. But I will pick a handful of the recipes to try new things, and come up with a few meals on my own. If I were to follow the meal plan, I’d feel overwhelmed.
  • Batch cook a bit and have a few shake go-to recipes.
  • In addition to the recommends included in the program, I have also started a gratitude journal. Each morning I list 3 things I am grateful for, and bullet 2 affirmations. Mind-body connection is just as important as diet.

Day 1 starts Sunday! I will be sending updates weekly. Stay tuned. 


JANUARY CLEANSE – If you are interested in doing a cleanse in the New Year, Standard Process is kicking off their 21 Day Standard Process Purification program with a webinar on the 9th of January, and the diet/supplement regime starts on the 10th. Let me know if you need to order a kit, and I will get you what you need. Their cleanse has dairy free and a standard version (both ~ $235)

This program has a Guide and a full eBook (1 Degree of Change) with step by step meal plans and a free app you can download, which has tracking tools, shopping lists/list builder and recipes from the meal plan.

A lot of information, but all of the above makes the program really easy to follow. Hope you have a healthy New Year and entire 2017 in whatever way you choose to strive for your best health.


My Skinny Jeans and The Holidays

white-sparkler-fire-holiday-festive-background-62500607On average, can you guess how much we tend to gain this time of year? MedPage Today has the details, and while I can layout all the calculated percentages, the gist is, people gain. Above all, the time it takes to put weight on, is nothing compared to the time it takes to shake it off.

So this season, aim to maintain. Yes, don’t try to lose weight, just maintain your weight. By New Years, you will be 1-5 pounds ahead of the average. A few tips on how to maintain:

  • Solidify your ongoing good habits. While eating predominately healthy, real food, we need to have a casual plan for meals throughout the week. Don’t skip meals, and stick to a meal routine. Meals should include fat (yes, we need more fat than most people think), protein and moderate carbohydrates. The golden rule I provide to clients is start the day off with protein (20-30 grams) to prevent cravings and snacking later in the day and then follow-up lunch and dinner with a palm-sized portion of protein, 1/4 of the plate coming from fruit or ancient grains, and the other half of the plate being vegetables, starchy (potatoes, parsnips, plantains) and non-starchy kinds. Have more of the starchy vegetables if you are active.
  • Eat breakfast. Even if you wake-up some mornings and decide you are not hungry, go about eating around the brunch hour and assess how much more you eat in the evening. I am not saying everyone carries their highest calorie intake into the few hours before bed, but more often my non-breakfast eaters do, and this time of day is the hardest to make the cleanest and healthiest choices.
  • Cap your time on Snapchat and Instagram and start organizing your kitchen, recipes and grocery list. The more organized and prepared we are with easy to grab snacks and batch-cooked meals, healthy eating is the obvious choice. Don’t overhaul your diet, just take one step closer to the farm. Instead of chips and granola bars, have nutsand fruit or vegetable. Instead of a protein bars, have hard boiled eggs or grassfed jerky.
  • Grocery shop every week. Even if there are more social gatherings this month, still purchase plenty of produce. When I am busy I am the queen of buying frozen items like berries, broccoli, cauliflower, green beans, mango, etc. This season is a great time to enjoy warm food, and warm berries in the evening is a great treat, and roasted vegetables (from frozen) can go a long way for a healthy dinner and leftovers.
  • If you are not getting 60 ounces of water a day by the afternoon, up your game. Being hydrated is one of the best things you can do for yourself. And it’s cheap!
  • Buddy up. Find a partner who has a similar health goal, and communicate daily with food ideas and challenges, using each other for support.

If you are the host, or attending parties:

  • If you are overseeing most of the food, make all you can ahead of time and freeze Approaching the event with fewer to-do’s will make the experience more fun and manageable.
  • When reaching for a treat at a party, opt for something you are honestly and truly going to enjoy and have time to chew and taste. Additionally, contribute to the party and bring a healthy app and dessert.
  • Indulge in the memories at holiday parties verse food. Not often do we think back on a memory and say, “I was so glad I ate all that food.” Keep portions in check, but also see how much you can laugh.
  • If you have a day of baking on the calendar, be sure to taste only what you need to. A teaspoon should be more than enough. If you need a distraction for your mouth while the house begins to smell like chocolate, write down your goal, pour yourself some tea, and pop in a piece of gum.

Secondly, the holidays are so much fun. Keep your perspective positive during this busy time of year and take care of yourself inside and out. Above we touched on food, yet, prioritize mental health too.

  • Pencil in a few extra sessions of yoga, briefly write up a gratitude list each morning, download a meditation app (Calm, HeadSpace, 10% Happier, etc) and or enjoy a good book.
  • Be sure to clock in enough sleep. Strive for at least 8 hours. When we are sleep deprived we tend to eat more food, make poorer food choices and move less overall.

Happy holidays, and cheers to the New Year in good health!


Weight Loss Food Myths

If you didn’t catch my social media posts about an interview I had with Redbook Magazine, catch the details here. 

9 “Healthy” Foods That Are Actually Destroying Your Weight Loss Goals

Like that cup of yogurt, for starters. ​

You know that all-too-familiar feeling: The one when you desperately need a snack, so you pour a quick bowl of whole-grain cereal or grab a bag of pre-portioned pretzels. Smart, right? Ehhh. It might make you even more hungry, unfortch. “When you eat processed carbs (anything made with refined grains, flour, or wheat), your blood sugar rises quickly because there’s little to no protein or fiber,” says Akilesh Palanisamy, M.D., an integrative medicine physician and author of The Paleovedic Diet. What’s worse: They could be sabotaging your weight loss goals, wreaking havoc all over your digestive system and making it virtually impossible to lower that number on the scale. So read on to learn more about the foods you thought were a wise choice—especially when you just need something other than kale—and what you can swap ’em out for instead.

Quinoa Chips

This new-to-the-scene snack food features all the buzzwords that make it sound like the ultimate healthy snack: It’s asuperfood! And gluten-free! There’s protein and fiber! The problem: They’re basically corn chips with a little quinoa thrown in, says Kelly Schmidt, R.D., a nutritionist and blogger at Paleo Infused Nutrition. And the quinoa itself has been so highly processed that it’s lost the nutritional boost that made it healthy in the first place. Need proof? Just compare the stats of one cup of cooked quinoa (8g protein, 5g fiber) to one serving of quinoa chips (1g protein, less than 1g fiber)—and then listen to your stomach make noise because it’s still going to be hungry.

The better choice: Beyond nuts and seeds, there are plenty of ways to get that crunchy texture. Choose super-portable whole fruit like an apple or pear, or go for freeze-dried fruit—it has a sweeter, crispy taste and way less sugar than dried fruit, says Schmidt. Bonus: They’re not super perishable, so they can be the go-to snack in your purse for a few days.

Microwaveable Popcorn

Nutritionists always say popcorn is ahealthy snack, and it is, so long as it’s made right. “The microwaveable kind has cancer-causing chemicals in them,” explains Palanisamy. One is called PFOA, which the EPA says is likely a cancerous carcinogen that’s found in the plastic of the bag. The other is in the butter flavor, and it’s known as diactyl, an organic compound that’s been linked with breathing issues and lung disease, thus making “popcorn lung” a real—and serious—health concern.

The better choice: Still go for the fiber-filled popcorn, just DIY it on the stove (using heart-healthy olive oil) with an air popper like this one from Cuisinart. And don’t be afraid to play with flavors, asadding in spices like turmeric or cinnamon can kickstart your metabolism without adding calories.

Fat-Free Cheese or Greek Yogurt

The obsession with low- and no-fat products we had in the ’90s still lingers, but reaching for them isn’t better than grabbing the full-fat kind. Researchers found that people who ate full-fat dairy tend to have lower body weight, less weight gain, and a lower risk of obesity compared to those who continued the fad. They think it’s likely because when you remove fat from dairy, you also strip away beneficial fatty acids that can help you feel full, so you end up eating more in the long run. Plus, a lot of people opt for flavored yogurt, which has tons of sugarthat, once again, put your blood sugar on a crazy roller coaster ride.

The better choice: Go full-fat—and don’t feel one stitch of guilt about it. As for flavor, mixing in natural foods like fruit, honey, or coconut chips can take your spoonful in whichever direction you crave.



 These salty bites may sound like a smart snack since they’re lower in fat and calories than potato chips, but they actually won’t do your waistline any favors. “They don’t contain any nutrients,” says Palanisamy. “They’re basically all carbs and loaded with sodium,” so they’ll put your blood sugar on a roller coaster ride, spiking your levels sky-high only to make you hungry as soon as it drops back down.

The better choice: Coconut chips, says Schmidt. Never heard of ’em? Get acquainted, as these babies are filled withhealthy fats to keep you full. And while they’re typically sweet, savory lovers can get in on the action now as brands likeDang Foods offer up flavors like bacon or chili lime.

Vegetable Chips

Chips made with sweet potato, beets, or parsnip—those ought to be healthy, what with vegetables being the primary ingredient and all. But Palanisamy says they’re pretty high in fat—around 9g per serving—and it’s not the good kind. The oils used range from canola to sunflower or safflower, all of which contain omega-6 fatty acids, which promote inflammationthat’s been linked with autoimmune diseases, heart disease, cancer, insulin resistance, and weight gain. Plus, the whole reason you’re eating them—because you want those good-for-you nutrients from the veggies—is a farce. Palanisamy says the chips have been stripped of those benefits, and they provide no protein and little-to-no fiber.

The better choice: If you’re craving the crunch, go for a handful of nuts (almond or macadamia) or seeds (sunflower or pumpkin) instead, says Palanisamy. Yes, they’re high in fat, but it’s the healthy omega-3 kind associated with heart health, lower risk of cancer, lower blood pressure, and reduced inflammation.

Rice Cakes

These have the perpetual stigma of being a smart, low-cal “diet food,” and sure, they’re not the worst idea in the world. “Rice cakes can make a good snack for people who are transitioning toward agluten-free diet if it’s a smart health decision for them to do so,” says Schmidt. But since they’re high in carbs, they’re high on the glycemic index, and a recent study found a potential link between high-glycemic foods and lung cancer. Not to mention high-glycemic foods tend to cause your blood sugar to spike, then crash, which makes you hungry all over again shortly after you snack.

The better choice: Top your rice cake with almond butter or mashed avocado to give it some staying power, suggests Schmidt. The spreads contain healthy fats and protein, which will keep you full longer and your blood sugar from rising too quickly.


Truth: The breakfast staple usually plays a major role in taming mid-afternoon hunger because it’s fast, convenient, and you can eat it straight from the bag. But therein lies the danger—it’s super easy to eat a reasonable portion, and then some more, and more after that. Then you’ve blown over 200 calories on an unsatisfying snack, because most of the time it’s made from refined grains that aren’t rich in nutrients, says Palanisamy. Another problem: Boxes tout being “high in fiber,” but it’s usually insoluble fiber that’s been shown to cause irritation in the gut, bloating, and other GI issues, he adds. Healthier, soluble fiber is what you find in foods like barley or beans.

The better choice: Make a bowl of plain oatmeal as it has the soluble fiber that can reduce your risk of heart disease and help food move along your GI tract (not to mention nix bloat and constipation), says Palanisamy. Ramp up the flavor—and score extra nutrients—by adding berries and chia seeds, which have a high level of omega-3s.

Popped Chips

Sadly, “popping” chips instead of baking or frying them doesn’t make much of a nutritional difference, says Palanisamy. Yes, they slash the fat content in half compared to regular potato chips, but they don’t offer any micronutrients, like vitamins and minerals, and their paltry fiber and protein quotas (1g of each)—not to mention calorie count—is comparable to what you find in a serving of the regular stuff.

The better choice: First, figure out if you’re actually hungry. Schmidt says people often reach for processed snacks when it’s a craving, and not true hunger. Ask yourself, “Would I eat carrots or an apple right now?” If the answer is yes, trythese junk food swaps. If not, grab a glass of water instead.

100-Calorie Snacks

Seems like a genius idea: Grab a bag and you have a pre-portioned, calorie-conscious snack at your convenience for those times you’re craving dessert. But you’re better off grabbing a more caloric snack that has tons of nutrients to actually keep you full. “When you’re eating a small 100-calorie bag of cookies or crackers, you’re not really getting what you want,” says Schmidt. And that makes you much more likely to reach for another, and another, and another.

The better choice: “If it’s not a whole food, it’s not worth your money,” says Schmidt. If dessert is what you’re after, try foods that are naturally sweet, like dates stuffed with peanut butter or any of these healthy options.

Gaining Knowledge – Losing Pounds

Prahran Mkt - AustraliaMost recently I posted an article written by a business counterpart about his 2 month journey on weight loss. Granted he is a Personal Trainer, you’d think he’d constantly be in top shape, yet, like Alex, I too have goals for my health including the number on the scale (and note, I like measurements more than a scale number).

My newest role as a mom is the best thing that could ever happen to me as a person. As many parents out there can agree, being a mom/dad can be trying, but this position brings so much joy and compassion in my life. On the flip side, going through a pregnancy and gaining 28 pounds; could have been more as Dex was born at 38 weeks, I have become a better dietitian and nutrition counselor trying to lose the weight. My biggest surprise is my impatience with how slowly it’s coming off. But the truth be told, this pace allows my body to adjust at a healthy, natural rate, and allows me to understand what habits are worth holding onto for a lifetime.

So 6 months and 1 week later I am at my pre-pregnancy weight and I thought I’d share some of the methods I used to get here.

1. SMART Goal

I defined my goal (and wrote it down! Often!), decided how I would keep myself on task, ensuring things moved in the right direction weighing-in every Monday. I picked Monday to make sure I never went “off my rocker” with beverages and food on the weekend. As well, every Monday weigh-in wasn’t always a loss. Furthermore, if I knew, just by the way I felt, I wasn’t going to see a lower number on the scale, I’d skip/delay that weigh-in. No need to do so, as it would leave a negative impression on my day, and I’d wait (no pun intended) until about Wednesday. I also broke my goal down. I wanted to lose 38 pounds (I was near my heaviest before getting pregnant), but my weekly goal was 1 pound a week. Ideally I wanted more, but realistically, it wasn’t happening without me feeling deprived and hungry.

2. Tracking My Macros

I befriended MyFitnessPal to not count calories, but to understand how my macronutrient (fat, protein, carbohydrate) ratios were measuring. Through the process I learned that eating more carbs (35-38% or around 100 grams a day; excluding non-starchy vegetables) and less fat (about 30%) worked best for my goal. Interesting, as I came to learn this by eating intuitively. I wanted more carbs (fruit, black rice, root vegetables) and less often craved grassfed beef or higher fat proteins. Before getting pregnant, I always aimed for uber low carb (about 50 grams a day), thinking it was my best method for maintaining weight. In this journey, I tried to keep low carb in mind, but to look at myself more individually to assess what was going to work for my goal. And not to brush over protein – I had about 1 gram of protein per pound of my current weight.

3. New Recipes & Hunger

It is not uncommon for me to create a personal meal plan. I’d think about what foods were appealing at the time and I’d create meals plugging them into Fitclick or MyFitnessPal. I definitely sourced Pinterest for inspiration and bought recipe books. I took it a step further too; putting sticky notes on recipes I planned to trial each week (when time allowed). I know, as soon as I get bored with my food, I reach for more food for satisfaction rather than to fulfill hunger. My solution here, as you can see, is to mix things up, and excite my palate with different flavors and meals. One thing important to note is I use my meal plans as a template; never did/do I follow it 100%. Overall, my meals are consistent throughout the week, and come the following 7 days, I change my ingredients/grocery list. Every night, I asses how hungry I feel. If I am rather hungry after dinner, I know this was a symptom of not eating enough during the day. This often happened, and one thing that has made the biggest difference, is with my high protein and vegetable lunch, I’ve added a small piece of fruit, rounding out the meal. I would not have been able to come to this conclusion if I didn’t track some of my meals. Bottom line, a food journal can be so powerful for healthy eating and assessing what works for weight loss.

4. Appreciating the Journey

To say the least, losing weight is not my favorite hobby. Indeed, one needs to enjoy the journey, as losing weight surely doesn’t have a deadline nor ends once we hit our goal weight. My real goal is striving for health, and clearly as I lose numbers on the scale, I am gaining insight on how to own my journey and be a better dietitian, counseling others in a similar process. Every day counts, and some day we will take two steps forward, and other days one step back. In the end it’s the trend that matters.

Cheers to you and good health,


Client Feedback – Personal Trainer Gains Insight with 15lb Weight Loss Goal

I partner with Alex Nsiah-Kumi, owner of Paramount Personal Training, and during my awesome (no exaggeration here, he is the best of the best) workout with him yesterday, he opened up to me about his 2 month plan of dropping 15 pounds. To say the least he looks great, and below I have included his blog post on the experience. Thanks for letting me share your story Alex. I am sure many can relate to your experience.

Original blog post can be found here.




I recently decided I wanted to lose some weight. 15 pounds to be exact.  I figured it would make me feel a bit better, not to mention refresh my memory and help me to better relate to my weight loss clients.

Well I lost my 15 pounds and I feel better. This experience definitely have a rekindled amount of empathy for those on their weight loss journey. It was definitely harder than I thought it would be and definitely harder than it was 10 years ago. The planning, the consistency. Realistic expectations! Im just like everyone else. I want results and I want them NOW!!!

So 8 weeks and 15 pounds later. I thought I would share the main things I did to help lose the weight.  Note, that 2 of the 3 are related to food & drink intake, not exercise.  They are pretty basic, but here they are:



Anyone that knows me knows I love to have a good time. I knew however, to lose weight I had to reduce my alcohol intake. I cut it out 100% for a few months, but what level you are willing to commit to will depend on you. You may want to say no drinks during the week. Or you may want to switch that beer or mixed drink for a glass of wine. Whatever it is make sure it is realistic and be sure you are commited to it. I have seen numerous cases where people work their butts off in the gym, eat clean and then derail their goals by drinking a bottle of wine every night with dinner. Don’t be “that guy” or girl.



As opposed to thinking about cutting things out of my diet I thought about adding things. I had a massive bowl of veggies or a salad before every meal. And when I say salad I am talking broccoli salad, kale salad, cabbage salad.  Something with some sustenance and nutrients, not just a bunch of iceberg lettuce.

Adding in all these veggies, helped me to get more nutrients and less calories. I also helped me to be able to slightly cut the portions of my already healthy meals. I’m a decent size guy, but do I really need a 16 ounces steak? I can honestly do fine with 8 ounces.



I’m a busy guy just like everyone else. Running my own business keeps me on the go and makes it hard at times to get my workouts in. Instead of just trying to workout when I got a chance, I put it in my schedule. Whether it was weights, playing basketball, or going to a yoga class. I made sure it was in my schedule. This helped my weight loss because now it was in my schedule, I didn’t just blow it off. I knew I had a noon yoga class. I didn’t get bogged down with paperwork, because I had a little alarm going off telling me it was time to workout.

Make 2014 Your Healthiest Year (With These 5 Tips)

Tis the season for us to think about personal goals and health initiatives. Before you decide where you want to go, understand where you have been by asking yourself these questions:

Where would you love to be at the end of 2014? How could your life be better? How could you feel more in control of your health? This vision you conjure – hold onto it, and believe you can reach it. Why would you accept anything less? Make it your intention and your reason why your goal is important. Make it your motivation each day, and celebrate every day and choice that will get you there.

Below are some of my top tips as an expert in the field of health and wellness. Above all, you know yourself the best, and do not set a goal that is too far out of reach. Making a small goal, and updating it weekly or bi-weekly facilitates initiating action.

Cheers to you and good health this year and beyond!

1. Hydrate

Sounds so simple, yet, many of us are not drinking enough (filtered) water. Funny enough, I recently went to an Integrative Medicine doctor last week and explained a few things about myself, and while anticipating to hear the doc prescribe me a supplement or herb, he said, one part of health is as simple as drinking ample amounts of water.

Drink half of your weight in ounces. Drinking enough water will help your body remove waste (detox), keep your joints fluid and muscles hydrated, provide mental clarity, and your skin looking young. One practice to help you reach a hydration goal is to have a handy water bottle on hand, like this one. The straw is helpful in making the drinking process quick and easy.

2. Nurture Your Gut

Digestion problems cause inflammation, and inflammation can cause our bodies to go into fat storage mode, and even worse, disease. The first steps to nurturing your gut is to remove irritating foods (GMOs, gluten, soy, vegetable oils, pasteurized dairy, perhaps non-sprouted legumes and grains) and add in superfoods to repair your gut like bone broth. To progress the healing process further, you also want to reinoculate your digestive tract with specific food and supplements like  fermented vegetables, coconut oil and probiotics. Gut health is getting notice and information on this will be trending in 2014.

3. Avoid Vegetable and Man-Made Oils

One thing you won’t be able to read on a food label for vegetable oils (including canola oil) and margarine is the inflammatory status. Bluntly, they are not doing your health any favors. Opt for better fats such as coconut oil, palm oil, grassfed butter for cooking, and olive oil, avocado oil, macadamia nut oil, sesame oil, walnut oil for cold uses. Like the fact you can fight fire with fire, we can fight fat by eating fat. Fat is essential for our health due to its healing properties, use to increase nutrient absorption and assistance in detoxing our liver. Make sure to have some sort of fat on your plate at each meal, and equally important, the right kind of fat.

4. Plan

I don’t think I can state it enough, “if we fail to plan, we plan to fail.” Mapping out some meals each week makes eating nutrient-dense food a lot easier. I request clients to take a look at their schedule each week, understand how often they will eat home, work, etc, and plan foods to make on a Sunday afternoon, so the meal prep during the week is quick and easy. I surely do this too. I boil some eggs, or make a crust-less quiche, I bake some sort of squash, chop up some raw vegetables for dips and salads and often have something brewing in the slow-cooker. If you need some recipe inspiration, I have a nice collection going on Pinterest.

5. Moderation

Perhaps my favorite tip: moderation. While working hard on your diet, fitness, career, relationships, etc, find a balance in enjoying things like a spa treatment, book/magazine, coffee date, glass of wine, or something I haven’t mentioned but you love. Being healthy is a balancing act, and not about deprivation nor perfection. Work hard, play hard and enjoy the moment at hand.



Today, my boy is 5 weeks old. Holy cow, how did this time fly by so quickly?


IMG_7885Nonetheless, as many new moms suggest, I am so in love with my baby, Declan (we call him Dex). No doubt, being a mom has its’ moments, but the smiles, cuddles and new role is indescribable.

Already, embracing this new family dynamic, I have learned heaps – from honing in on personal strengths (and understanding my weaknesses) and streamlining my outlook on priorities, health and more. Of course, with any situation I am presented with, my wheels begin to turn on how to grow stronger, regarding wellness, and how to apply my observations into my nutrition practice. Indeed at 3 weeks postpartum, I have continued to meet with clients. Granted I am not working as many hours right away, yet, if I can balance it all, I want to continue my love of helping people with their health goals. As well, now that I am on the other side of my pregnancy, I have similar goals as my patients to shed some weight, all while taking care of myself.

Often enough, internally I find myself echoing recommendations I preach to clients, including:

  • Be patient with the process. Whatever goal you are trying to achieve – weight loss, new eating habits, etc, the results will not come overnight, within or week (or 5!). Striving for a set objective comes with a journey, and along the way, aim to make the best choices, stay positive and assess progress routinely. 
  • Love the skin you are in. When we love ourselves, rather than criticize ourselves, we become more confident and determined.
  • Consistency is key. Try to not make too many changes as once – as well, eating on a routine helps us understand how much food our bodies need. Thus can prevent overeating, especially in the night hours. If I, or a client, find myself ravenous at night, it’s quite possible too little food is consumed during the day.
  • Make small, realistic goals. For example, my priority is to eat healthy and maintain optimal blood sugar control, providing the best nutrition for Dex, as well as, to make sure the scale is going down, not up, during the process. Over the last 10 months, I gained 35 pounds, and I don’t want or intend to make it a goal to lose all the weight by my 6 week appointment with the doctor or sooner. If this was the case, I would merely set myself up for failure, and I would have to take obscene measures to even try to get there. So my solution is to have a daily goal to consume a certain amount of produce, protein and water and to ensure my measures are going in the right direction weekly.
  • Treat myself. It’s important, no matter how busy we get, to have small weekly or monthly treats for ourselves. And this does not include food; I am suggesting personal enjoyments like getting my nails done, or buying a favorite magazine, booking a massage, etc. Health isn’t only about how much we eat and/or move. There is SOOO much more to it.

This list can easily continue but I am happy to be on the same page as many of my clients, and will continue to be once I hit my goal. Maintaining optimal health is not a breeze. Wherever I stand with my goals, I need to address a plan. “If we fail to plan, we plan to fail,” and this is true starting with a grocery list to ensure we plan balanced meals.

I am enjoying my new motherly role and look forward to continue to grow as a person and a more impactful dietitian.

What tactics do you layout to meet your health goals? Do you have any feedback on how you achieved your latest personal initiative?

Feedback is always welcomed!


What Does Paleo Infused Nutrition Mean?

Paleo: Paleo comes from the word paleolithic, which in brief means ancestral and prehistoric.

Infused: Infused means to cause to be permeated with something (as a principle or quality) that alters usually for the better.

Nutrition: Nutrition is the bounty of our health and describes the entity of Paleo Infused Nutrition. 

Paleo Infused Nutrition:

Put it all together and therein lies the foundation of my company – educating clients on how to achieve optimal health based on eating in accordance with historical human nutrition (reprogramming our epigenetics) and overcoming today’s social pressures and the food industry (conventional wisdom) and reaching personal health goals. We have a rich cuisine, as this is great within itself, but we are out of touch of our roots. With conflicting health and nutrition advice in the media and in varying health professionals, I ensure to simplify my counseling so it makes complete sense and it hard to forget.

Paleo Infused Nutrition is focused on helping others, including the average person looking for improved health and those who have been diagnosed with a medical condition, to change their lifestyle, leading to a long and positive quality of life, season after season.

There are two main guidelines to my Paleo Infused Nutrition lifestyle:

  1. eat whole, nutrient-dense food
  2. reduce/avoid processed, refined foods – grains (including “whole grains”), legumes, pasteurized dairy and sugar.

Usually the biggest red flag in the above guidelines are the avoidance of grains. While I do not intend to strip all grains from one’s diet, I will help my clients understand a new perspective on these industrialized foods. And with grain’s modest nutrition profile, their propensity to trigger food intolerances (gluten and grains), carbohydrate cravings, addictions, binges and their limited serving of fiber, it is hard for me to suggest grains to be part of someone’s every meal or snack.

While the above guidelines are simple in script, they take adjustments to apply. That is what I am here for – to help coach you, educate you, empower you to be your best, eat your best and feel your best.

Cheers to you and good health. – Kel

FAQ – Breastfeeding & (Paleo) Diet Change

If you are a new mother, breastfeeding and wanting to shed some weight, you may enjoy this common FAQ. If you have any experiences to add, please comment; we would love to hear from you.

My sweet nephew Beau

Client FAQ:

“I’m looking to jump start losing the rest of my baby weight and was thinking of going paleo, as I have before with significant other. However, I do have some concerns about changing my diet THAT much since I am breastfeeding. My question is: do you have any info on the affects of paleo while breastfeeding? Is there a way to ease into it so that it won’t affect my milk supply? Any info you can find would be so helpful.”


While my response is not black and white everyone, hence I do not know exactly what foods are currently being consumed, I believe it is advisable and surely should not negatively impact milk supply switching to a whole food diet, such as a paleo diet. Yet, it is crucial to keep calories adequate. With breastfeeding calorie needs can increase by 200-500 calories. Keeping hydration up is almost, if not more important too. Drink that H2O.

While I am not yet a mother, there are testimonials of moms who have breastfeed their children on both a paleo diet and a Standard American Diets and have found these observations:

  • Paleo breastfeed babies (meaning mother ate a paleo diet) had better sleep, fewer spit ups, less gas and few to no rashes on the bum or face.

Of course this is not scientific data, and all babies are different, but do a Google search and see what you find. I think there is some truth in the consistency of the above noted trends.

Overall, making the change to paleo or to a cleaner diet, you need support. Whether it’s your significant other helping you, family or frineds, I too am happy to coach you along. Please don’t hesistate to ask.

Hands down, you are a wonder woman. Having a baby is not a piece of cake and these breastfeeding months are not a bed of roses either. Changing a diet, and setting standards for yourself can be stressful. Go at a pace of making change that works for you and if you slip-up, no stress. There is tomorrow and the next, wide open for you to be successful with this goal.

Overall some suggestions of transitioning to a paleo diet is to be sure to get good fats (coconut oil, avocado, grass fed butter, etc) in along with some solid protein sources, such as wild fish, grass fed meat, free range, organic eggs. Fill up on vegetables and some fruit. The amount of fat recommended is likely more than you have been eating. Do not be afraid of fat  it is good for you, good for weight loss and good for your baby.

Cheers to you and good health,



See You Later Hypertension

Last fortnight I was asked to participate in an online interview (article originally published on: about natural ways to manage high blood pressure. Not only was this request interesting but it is a topic that needs more coverage. High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a silent killer. I hate to be so blunt but there is no way around it – one in four adults (US data) have hypertension. Untreated hypertension can get ugly causing kidney damage, stroke, heart disease, dementia and more. However, with most things related to health, you can turn it around for the better. If hypertension is something you deal with personally, consider the below to incorporate with your daily routine. As always, if you need some help, feel free to contact me.

  • What supplements/foods do you recommend people with high blood pressure try, to help lower their blood pressure?

Before advising someone on what to eat and what to supplement with, I first need to understand if there is anything else going on with their health, such as diabetes, kidney disease, etc. I also want to know what medication they are taking.

Generally speaking though, I advise eating a moderately high protein and fat diet, with moderately low (less than 150 grams per day) carbohydrates. Carbohydrates should be mainly sourced from vegetables, legumes/lentils, tubers and fruit.

Important foods to consider are those rich in potassium (bananas, avocado, herbs, cocoa, nuts, and tomatoes), magnesium (pumpkin, squash, cocoa, nuts, fish), vitamin C (citrus fruits, broccoli, bell peppers, cauliflower, cabbage, celery) and vitamin E (almonds, herbs, olives), omega 3 fatty acids (fatty fish like salmon or sardines) and flavonols (red wine, grapes, cocoa). Do you see a trend? I am a believer in dark chocolate/cocoa nibs and consume cocoa in one shape or another daily.

However, more important than knowing what to eat is knowing foods to cut back on, including foods high in fructose and processed foods (chips, deli meat, bread, pastries, cookies, desserts, etc).

Fructose, simply put, is a type of sugar. It is under a lot of scrutiny causing detrimental things to our health including hypertension. While the jury is still out, there is a true consensus that fructose does more harm than good. The important take away is to know what foods are high in fructose i.e. candies/lollies, cold breakfast cereals, desserts such as ice cream, cake, muffins, salad dressing, breads, pizza,crackers, canned fruit and juices with added sweeteners and more.

My recommended supplements include high-quality fish oil, a strong probiotic, magnesium twice a day, Himalayan sea salt and CoQ10. Food always comes first.

  • What are your thoughts on salt and high blood pressure? Should we be limiting salt intake or is the salt thing all blown out of proportion?

You may be surprised to hear that I do not stress salt restrictions. Processed foods should certainly get more vigilance in this space. I think overall sodium claims are blown out of proportion and certainly, I strongly advise the use of Himalayan sea salt. Overall, individuals need to self-assess how salt makes them feel. If the consumption of salt makes someone retain fluid or make their heart palpitate/speed up, then a reduced salt intake should be implemented. However, I think there are far more important actions to take than demonizing salt. Focus should zero in on stress levels, adequate sleep, exercise, eating whole foods (this does not include whole grains) and maintaining a healthy weight.

  • Not necessarily specific to high blood pressure, but what are your top 5 healthiest foods we should all be trying to eat more of, and why?

Grassfed/free range meat – protein is essential and free range meat, ideally, beef, has an optimal fatty acid ratio, up to 6 times more omega 3’s compared to the grocery store variety. Certainly, omega-3 fatty acids play a vital role in every cell and system in our bodies. Beyond the nutrient profile grassfed/free range beef offers, it is a great tool for optimal health. It is satiating, protective against cancer and cardiovascular disease, has low insulinogenic properties and more.

Coconut – whether it is coconut oil, flour, cream or milk, I welcome it all. I consume this functional food daily, reaping one of the thousands of benefits it offers. In traditional medicine, coconut is used to treat a wide variety of health problems and it is so versatile to use. I make pancakes from coconut flour and milk, I cook with coconut oil, especially with eggs and coconut cream is delicious with berries.

Pumpkin – is loaded with healthy starches and it is absolutely delicious. Pumpkin is nutrient-rich, easy to make and can satisfy a sweet or savory craving. I have learned to cook pumpkin in a variety of fashions from pumpkin soup (with coconut milk and cinnamon), roasted pumpkin salad (with pine nuts, spinach, feta and homemade balsamic dressing) to pumpkin porridge (mixing puree pumpkin with eggs, nuts, and raisins).  Pumpkin can also serve as a dessert by garnishing it with spices and honey.

Free range eggs – they are one of few foods that naturally contain vitamin D and are far superior to caged eggs when it comes to nutrient content. They are rich in vitamin A and E and omega 3 fatty acids, among many other important vitamins and minerals.

Fermented foods – I am all about gut health and a happy gut, makes a good immune system. Fermented foods such as sauerkraut, kefir, kimchi, etc provide probiotics to our intestines. There are plenty of benefits to adding probiotics to our bodies, including protection from colon cancer, relief from lactose intolerance and diarrhea, reduction in cavities, and more. Improved digestion means more nutrients, vitamins, and minerals are absorbed, making you an overall healthier being.

Cheers to you and good health,