FAQ’s When Working With Kelly

With our new location to Columbus, Ohio, we thought we would post some of our FAQs to help people understand the steps involved in working together.

WHEN AND WHERE DO YOU SEE CLIENTS?

I am located in Bexley, OH and meet with clients in the library or a quiet coffee location. However, I try my best to accommodate patients schedules by providing various times throughout the day including evening appointments. FaceTime or phone appointments are also available. Skype is not HIPPA certified and therefore not a recommended platform to meet on. If keen to do a video conference, Zoom or Chiron can be used.

WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT IN A CONSULT?

An initial consultation will last an hour and will include a full nutritional assessment- diet history (Kelly will request a 3 day intake prior to the meeting), recent lab review/discussion, weight history, family history, lifestyle, stress and sleep management, patient goals and patient needs.

Nutrition follow up appointments will include nutrition recommendations (meals, snacks, recipes), nutrition counseling, and support.

HOW OFTEN DO I COME?

Each patients needs vary. Most clients follow up in 1-2 weeks initally and then may continue to come in weekly, bi-weekly, monthly or as needed.

WHAT SHOULD I BRING?

Before your appointment please fill out your paperwork. Kelly will email you all of the forms necessary in advance. These forms include: Food Log_Questions Form and Client Agreement.

WHAT PAYMENT METHODS ARE ACCEPTED?

Check, Chase Quickpay, Credit Card (Kelly uses Square), PayPal and Cash are all accepted.

DO YOU TAKE INSURANCE?

No, I do not take insurance. However, I can provide you with a Superbill to submit to insurance for out of network benefits so that you can receive reimbursement directly from your insurance company.

IS THERE A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A REGISTERED DIETITIAN (RD/RDN) AND A NUTRITIONIST?

A Dietitian (RD/RDN) has obtained a minimum of a BS in Nutritional Sciences, completed 1200 hours of supervised practice in various fields, as well as, has passed a National Boards Exam administered by the Commission on Dietetic Registration. Registered Dietitians must complete continuing education to maintain their license.

A nutritionist is not a national title and there are no guidelines for being a nutritionist.

Client FAQ: When Traveling What Can I Prep/Eat?

I easily answer this question once a week. Regardless if I have a client traveling for the week for work, on the road daily for sales meetings, or just plain busy, people always want to know what to pack/snack and eat for their meals.

Client Question: Kelly, I’m on the road this week, what would you pack to keep things healthy and satisfying for all 3 meals?

Kelly: I know this gig well. The last 2 years I was on the road weekly and sometimes weeks at a time. Depending on what your travel looks like, here are some ideas:

hard boiled eggs are great for early morning flights. Even better, pair 2-3 eggs with some raw veggies. Get a coffee at the airport and you are good to go.

In your handbag/briefcase have macadamia nuts, dark chocolate, fresh fruit, even canned tuna or canned salmon. You can pick up a plain salad from about anywhere and top it with some solid protein.

If you are staying somewhere overnight, don’t hesitate to go to the grocery store and a gourmet gas station and get a few items for your mini fridge. I’ve bough large bags of dark leafy greens, guacamole, deli meat, olives, etc to have for dinner after a long day. I may have paired this with a glass of red wine, but I was saving money, managing what I was eating and I didn’t feel exhausted after a long week.

No doubt though, eating in on the road is not always realistic. My go-to’s are Chipotle (bowl with pork, all 3 salsas, lettuce and guacamole), Jimmy Johns (an unwich with extra meat and avocado) or a non-chain restaurant and build/choose a meal based on protein and vegetables. Of course. always gluten free.

While traveling, sleep can be rough and the travel can dehydrate you. Always have some water on hand and bring along some herb teas to help you wind down in the evening.

More snack ideas can be found here.

What are your go-to foods while traveling?

Improve Your Health BY Eating Gluten Free

 

“As bizarre as it might sound, what you eat or smoke today could affect the health and behavior of your great-grandchildren.” – Ethan Walters, Discover magazine

Changing the way you eat, including the exclusion of gluten, is a stride in the right direction. Directing you to a link that houses over 200 reasons to avoid wheat can be a motivator.

Know this, there has been a sharp increase in interest and research on the topic of “gluten intolerance.” In 1971, there were 71 studies listed on MEDLINE which referenced gluten. Last year in 2011, there were 514. Gluten is linked to everything from infertility, to diabetes, to schizophrenia and more. According to Dr. David Clark DC, a functional neurologist and endocrinologist, “There’s not a disease or health condition you can think of that do not have an association – in the research literature – with gluten sensitivity.”

Gluten is in wheat, barley, rye and oats (unless marked gluten-free oats), yet, it is in so many foods from the obvious bread, cakes, pastas to sneakier areas such as soy sauce, marinades, mustard, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, preservatives (maltodextrin), BBQ sauces (Stubbs is safe), dressings (Primal Kitchen and Tessamae’s are clean), pre-packaged spices, instant rice and more. Clearly, the transition is not easy, but the below steps can be a start.

Removing Gluten Successfully:

  • Focus on REAL foods – swap our processed foods, for real foods. Used to bread at dinner, have a potato or rice. Used to toast and peanut butter, move to a rice cake or fruit. (Side note: we both LOVE PBJ’s – try this, warm up a cup of raspberries with a large spoonful of peanut butter. So good). The best way to know something is gluten-free is when you choose a food in it’s natural, fresh, the whole form. No label necessary.
  • Read Labels – Even when you would assume something would not have wheat, barley or rye in it, read the labels. Some words that are gluten-containing but not obvious include: maltodextrin (yet this can come from corn too), malt, soy sauce, modified food starch, to name a few.
  • Know Your Grains – Gluten containing grains can include wheat flour, white flour, graham flour, Semolina, Durham, Bulgur, Kamut, Kasha, Matzo meal, Couscous, Spelt, and Triticale. Thankfully most package now bold if wheat is in the product. below the food label. Other gluten grains/foods: orso, crackers, pretzels, ice cream, yogurt (esp if they have flavorings added in), dips, blue cheese, Gorgonzola, veggie burgers, imitation seafood and more.
  • Make the Decision – when making the transition to be and eat gluten free, don’t go halfway. It will makes this much harder, and social pressure (when eating out or hanging out with friends) may not be supportive when they see you do a variety of things. Make the decision today, and tomorrow and the following.
  • Make Over Your Kitchen – clean our your kitchen of gluten-containing foods. As an a la carte service, I have helped clients go through their kitchen to confirm what is good and what is not. I also help orchestrate the setup of the kitchen to better influence food decisions.
  • Social Media – follow a gluten-free website or Instagram account that you enjoy, and can serve as inspiration for meal ideas.
  • Find a Friend – with the same gluten-free goal. Any journey is better with support.

Related articles:

15 Unexpected Foods That Contain Gluten

Dairy & Bone Health

For frequent viewers and those new to my site, you will know or become familiar with the notion I do not advocate a diet rich in dairy, especially not pasteurized, grain-fed, non-organic dairy. Yet, with this, common questions arise regarding the avoidance of dairy and bone health.

Firstly, bone health is more than getting enough calcium. As far as nutrition, and not even addressing the importance of anaerobic exercise, bone health encompasses proper amounts of magnesium, calcium and fat soluble vitamins such as vitamin A, D, and K2.

Some nutrient-dense food sources abundant in calcium includes dark leafy greens (kale, broccoli), bone broth, sesame seeds, dried figs, sea vegetables, to name a few. Furthermore, eating a whole food (not whole grain) diet increases your absorption rate of these important minerals. To clarify, this also mean limiting or avoiding grains. Grains contains phytates and phytates bind to the minerals we consume, reducing the overall absorption rate. So what does this mean? The nutrients listed on a bread (grain) food label will not all be absorbed. The phytates will leach to the minerals and therefore, you will have some nutrient-dense urine. Too far? Sorry.

However, the bottom-line is a diet including whole, natural food, including quality protein will make us thrive. Some people can continue eating dairy, but I do not recommend for it to be the center of our plates.

Know this, not all dairy is one in the same. Raw and grass-fed dairy products are far superior to pasteurized, homogenized,  processed, low-fat dairy. It is important to get dairy from cows raised naturally, healthily and to eat full fat dairy – that is where the naturally occurring (not fortified) vitamins A, D and K2 are found along with healthy fatty acids (CLA).

If ranked, raw dairy is the winner as far as nutrition content and overall health benefits. Second, grassfed dairy and third would be organic dairy. If you can get raw, grassfed and organic dairy, rock on! But it’s not all that easy. A few brands I recommend for patients who can handle dairy (who do not have an auto-immune condition, who do not have type 1 diabetes in their family medical history age pending and who do not have a weak digestive track) include:

  1. Noosa Yoghurt
  2. Join a CSA and get raw dairy through a farmer
  3. Natural by Nature Grassfed, Dairy Products
  4. Eat Wild Grassfed Products
  5. Trader Joes has a Raw Cheddar cheese
  6. Whole Foods has raw cheese
  7. Kerrygold butter (can be found at more supermarkets, including Trader Joes)
  8. US Wellness Meats 

Indeed, we can live and thrive without milk, cheese, cream, okay maybe not butter (or ghee from grassfed cows), but health and healthy bones include consumption of a combination of natural nutrients. The best way to help your frame is to eat foods in its natural state. Furthermore, it is not supported to supplement with calcium for recent data indicates detrimental affects on our health when doing so. (1,2,3)

Ironic enough, our country (USA) has the highest occurrence of calcium supplementation and the highest occurrence of osteoporosis. The Nurses’ Health Study followed 72,337 women for over 18 years and found that dairy intake did not reduce the risk of osteoporosis-related hip fractures.(2)

This is some food for thought, don’t you agree?

Fueling our bodies and our health with whole, unmodified food is and will always be the answer.

1. Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Willett WC. Comment on the IOM Vitamin D and Calcium Recommendations. Harvard School of Public Health: The Nutrition Source, 2010.
2. Zoler ML. High Vitamin D Intake Linked to Reduced Fractures. Family Practice News, 2010(November 16, 2010).
3. Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Orav EJ, Willett, WC, et al., A Higher Dose of Vitamin D is Required for Hip and Non-vertebral Fracture Prevention: A Pooled Participant-based Meta-analysis of 11 Double-blind RCTs, in The American Society for Bone and Mineral Research 2010 Annual Meeting2010: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
4. Tsukahara N, Ezawa I. [Calcium intake and osteoporosis in many countries]. Clin Calcium. 2001 Feb;11(2):173-7.
5. Feskanich D, Willett WC, Colditz GA. Calcium, vitamin D, milk consumption and hip fractures: a prospective study among postmenopausal women. Am J Clin Nutr 2003;77(2): 504-11.

Similar articles on this topic:

Raw Milk Reality: Is Raw Milk Worth the Risk?

Raw Milk – Interview with Mary McGonigle-Martin

Drinking Raw Milk Is Worth The Risk, Advocates Say

Milk 101: Whole, Raw, Organic, Low-Fat, etc

What Does Paleo Infused Nutrition Mean?

Paleo: Paleo comes from the word paleolithic, which in brief means ancestral and prehistoric.

Infused: Infused means to cause to be permeated with something (as a principle or quality) that alters usually for the better.

NutritionNutrition is the bounty of our health and describes the entity of Paleo Infused Nutrition. 

Paleo Infused Nutrition:

Put it all together and therein lies the foundation of my company – educating clients on how to achieve optimal health based on eating in accordance with historical human nutrition (reprogramming our epigenetics) and overcoming today’s social pressures and the food industry (conventional wisdom) and reaching personal health goals. We have a rich cuisine, as this is great within itself, but we are out of touch of our roots. With conflicting health and nutrition advice in the media and in varying health professionals, I ensure to simplify my counseling so it makes complete sense and it hard to forget.

Paleo Infused Nutrition is focused on helping others, including the average person looking for improved health and those who have been diagnosed with a medical condition, to change their lifestyle, leading to a long and positive quality of life, season after season.

There are two main guidelines to my Paleo Infused Nutrition lifestyle:

  1. eat whole, nutrient-dense food
  2. reduce/avoid processed, refined foods – grains (including “whole grains”), legumes, pasteurized dairy and sugar.

Usually the biggest red flag in the above guidelines are the avoidance of grains. While I do not intend to strip all grains from one’s diet, I will help my clients understand a new perspective on these industrialized foods. And with grain’s modest nutrition profile, their propensity to trigger food intolerances (gluten and grains), carbohydrate cravings, addictions, binges and their limited serving of fiber, it is hard for me to suggest grains to be part of someone’s every meal or snack.

While the above guidelines are simple in script, they take adjustments to apply. That is what I am here for – to help coach you, educate you, empower you to be your best, eat your best and feel your best.

Cheers to you and good health. – Kel

FAQ – Breastfeeding & (Paleo) Diet Change

If you are a new mother, breastfeeding and wanting to shed some weight, you may enjoy this common FAQ. If you have any experiences to add, please comment; we would love to hear from you.

My sweet nephew Beau

Client FAQ:

“I’m looking to jump start losing the rest of my baby weight and was thinking of going paleo, as I have before with significant other. However, I do have some concerns about changing my diet THAT much since I am breastfeeding. My question is: do you have any info on the affects of paleo while breastfeeding? Is there a way to ease into it so that it won’t affect my milk supply? Any info you can find would be so helpful.”

Answer:

While my response is not black and white everyone, hence I do not know exactly what foods are currently being consumed, I believe it is advisable and surely should not negatively impact milk supply switching to a whole food diet, such as a paleo diet. Yet, it is crucial to keep calories adequate. With breastfeeding calorie needs can increase by 200-500 calories. Keeping hydration up is almost, if not more important too. Drink that H2O.

While I am not yet a mother, there are testimonials of moms who have breastfeed their children on both a paleo diet and a Standard American Diets and have found these observations:

  • Paleo breastfeed babies (meaning mother ate a paleo diet) had better sleep, fewer spit ups, less gas and few to no rashes on the bum or face.

Of course this is not scientific data, and all babies are different, but do a Google search and see what you find. I think there is some truth in the consistency of the above noted trends.

Overall, making the change to paleo or to a cleaner diet, you need support. Whether it’s your significant other helping you, family or frineds, I too am happy to coach you along. Please don’t hesistate to ask.

Hands down, you are a wonder woman. Having a baby is not a piece of cake and these breastfeeding months are not a bed of roses either. Changing a diet, and setting standards for yourself can be stressful. Go at a pace of making change that works for you and if you slip-up, no stress. There is tomorrow and the next, wide open for you to be successful with this goal.

Overall some suggestions of transitioning to a paleo diet is to be sure to get good fats (coconut oil, avocado, grass fed butter, etc) in along with some solid protein sources, such as wild fish, grass fed meat, free range, organic eggs. Fill up on vegetables and some fruit. The amount of fat recommended is likely more than you have been eating. Do not be afraid of fat  it is good for you, good for weight loss and good for your baby.

Cheers to you and good health,

Kel

 

Client FAQ – Rice

I had a question – I saw on your latest post that one of the foods you eat is white rice. I thought brown rice is better for you?

The difference between brown and white rice is minimal but big enough to make a fuss over. On the outside looking in, brown rice’s nutrient profile looks better (fiber, etc) but brown rice more antinutrients, which come from the bran and germ part of the seed.

If you are aware of the process of how white rice is made, the bran and germ is mostly removed, making it a less allergenic food source. According to the Weston A. Price Foundation, approximately 84-99% of the dry weight of brown rice is phytic acid. This is where white rice measures up more in our favor. Bottom line, if you are looking for nutritious food seek out ingredients, produce, protein that are more dense in vitamins and minerals per calorie. Nonetheless, rice can be a good vehicle for healthy fats such as ghee, butter and/or coconut oil and above all, if you do not need the carbs, opt for cauliflower rice.

For more reading on antinutrients, check out a post on Marks Blog by clicking here.

Cheers to you and good health,

Kel