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Nov 02

Hydration + Hot Yoga

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I just wrapped up a call with a client and she openly shared she had only consumed 4 ounces of water yesterday by dinner time. This quickly reminded me that we often overlook the importance of hydrating, and easily knock it off the priority list. But 4 ounces, that is wild, and so little. On average, I recommend about 75 ounces of water per day for my female clients (averaging 150 lbs), or a little shy of 10 cups. It’s a task, but well worth accomplishing. Why?

Building on the conversation of endurance, last week I did a hot yoga class at Blue Spot Yoga in Bexley, OH. Shout out to Staci McCool; she is one of a kind and born to be an instructor and leader.

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Yet as soon as I walked in the yoga room this one evening, I immediately regretted my efforts of hydrating early in the day, and honestly, the day before too. My dehydration can easily impair my performance and I generally appear to struggle during the class. I know I am not the best yogi on the block, but I am a better one when I drink enough water and fuel properly.

As I laid on my mat before class, I thought of chugging the bottle next to me before I heard the words, “Let’s begin,” but, no, it would perhaps do more harm than good. What? Yes. Why?!

  • it takes about 45 minutes for water to absorb into our cells,
  • it’s uncomfortable to drink a lot of water during aerobic activity and it takes away from the practice,
  • drinks taken during class, should be paced about every 4 postures and should be considered as refreshers,

Take it from me, do your homework and hydrate 24 hours leading up to an activity like hot yoga, and I’ll summarize some good nutrition advice for the practice soon, but reach for hydrating foods such as produce, soups and smoothies, minimize processed foods including grains not in their pure, whole form, making quinoa, wild rice, whole gluten free oats, millet, buckwheat groats our best options.

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For estimating water needs – take body weight in pounds and divide by 2. Going off the example above, a 150 lbs person would be 75 ounces of water minimum.

  • This estimated water intake is to be exactly water. Coffee, sodas, even La Croix, tea do not count towards the tally.
  • For exercise, to be exact, weigh in to assess hydration loss. Hydrate enough to get back to pre-exercise weight. If a scale is not handy, drink to comfort post workout and refresh with water during.
  • Spring and mineral water are best, but you can spice things up by adding a few berries, cucumbers, or citrus (orange/lemon/lime) to your glass of water.

Stay tuned for more fueling advice, and lastly, if you do hot yoga daily, consider hydrating with mother nature’s electrolyte beverage such as coconut water and while striving for a whole food clean diet, don’t shy away from sea salt (avoid table salt!). Listen to your body salt to your in-tune desire.

Cheers to you and good health,

Kelly

Kelly Schmidt Wellness