Recommended Grocery List

If we fail to plan, we plan to fail. Eating healthy begins with a good grocery list and having an idea of what meals to make for the week ahead. More tips and advice below.

Produce – focusing on seasonal produce and organic if possible

  • Veggies – lots and lots!
  • Sweet potatoes – great for sweet potato chips or just oven roasted with butter or coconut oil.
  • Mushrooms – use these in everything, from eating raw to throwing in eggs.
  • Wild green
  • Broccoli – usually buy frozen in bulk, therefore, no stress on consuming it before it may spoil.
  • Zucchini, asparagus, brussels sprouts, cabbage, all pending on the planned meals for the week.
  • Cauliflower – use as cauli mash or cauli rice.
  • Fresh herbs – can really change the way a meal tastes, and provide antioxidants and helps detoxify our body.
  • Avocado – helps heal us from the inside out.
  • Frozen berries – for those nights I want something sweet – coconut cream, cocoa nibs and berries.
  • Bananas – so good frozen
  • Jicama – full of fiber and great for dicing in a stiry-fry, salad or slice cylinders and use as a chip.
  • Lemons/Limes

Health Tips:

Eat fermented foods daily. You can find options at Whole Foods (including Kombucha), fermented vegetables at the farmer’s market and online at

Overall diversify the types of produce you eat weekly, even simply rotate the type of salad greens you eat.


  • Anything grass fed/free range at a good price – beef, lamb, venison, pork
  • Nitrate free bacon – shortcut or Canadian bacon
  • Organic, free-range poultry – opt for skin-on, bone in. Both of these elements are mineral rich and good for our body.
  • No nitrate, hormone free, gluten free deli meat (Boar’s Head, Applegate, Columbus
  • WILD Salmon, tilapia, scallops, calamari, tuna, cod, shrimp – usually buy frozen and some fresh if eating same day.
  • Sardines

Health Tips:

If you don’t have access to quality protein sources there are some great online stores and possible local CSA’s. I recommend US Wellness Meats, Tropical Traditions, Vital Choice (awesome seafood) and Eat Wild websites. Amazon is great for getting certain ingredients, including jerky.

Choose wild caught fish and not farmed. The nutritional profiles in wild are better and contain fewer toxins.


  • Organic (grassfed is even better) butter
  • Full fat, organic and grassfed cheese
  • Free range, organic eggs

Compared to official U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutrient data for commercial eggs, eggs from hens raised on pasture contain: 1/3 less cholesterol, 1/4 less saturated fat, 2/3 more vitamin A, 2 times more omega- 3 fatty acids, 3 times more vitamin E, and 7 times more beta carotene.*


  • Pickles
  • Oils such as coconut, macadamia nut and high quality olive oil
  • Nuts – store them in a cool place, heat can turn them rancid
  • Coconut flour and cream/milk
  • Dark chocolate and cocoa nibs
  • Himalayan sea salt
  • Hot sauce and spices
  • Tea and coffee (organic coffee)
  • Raw honey (real raw honey)
  • Salsa ( no corn or wheat ingredients)
  • Chia, hemp, whole seeds (soak chia seeds overnight in water or unsweetened almond milk/coconut milk to have a porridge like texture)
  • Tamari (gluten free soy sauce)

Lopez-Bote, C. J., R.Sanz Arias, A.I. Rey, A. Castano, B. Isabel, J. Thos (1998). “Effect of free-range feeding on omega-3 fatty acids and alpha-tocopherol content and oxidative stability of eggs.” Animal Feed Science and Technology 72: 33-40.

Do You Know What’s in Season Right Now?

Back in the day, we could all probably answer this question within seconds, but with recent technology, communication and travel advances, our food is making it to our neighborhood grocery store, from around the world. So who knows if I would naturally be eating bing cherries right now? One way to tell, is of course, whip out a Google search, but also really pay attention to the food you are eating. For example, last month my typical lunch was a lettuce wrap of some sort, and when I made grassfed beef patties, I craved onion and tomato. How did my tomato taste and look? Guess. It was dull in color and nearly tasteless. Why? Tomatoes are provided year round but not at their peak. Before I run out and do my Sunday errands, I am gathering a grocery list and docking a few “seasonal” produce items on my list, so I can thoroughly enjoy the flavors of the season. Please note this list was pulled for the Illinois  Midwest area. If you live in another region, click here.

For April/May:

  • Asparagus
  • Broccoli (one of my favorites!)
  • Cabbage
  • Cherries
  • Cucumbers (I love cucumber and tahini sauce)
  • Greens
  • Herbs (I rotate the type of herbs I buy each week. They can dress up any meal)
  • Leeks
  • Lettuce
  • Onion
  • Peas
  • Radishes
  • Rhubarb
  • Spinach
  • Sprouts
  • Squash
  • Strawberries

Come June, I can enjoy some luscious tomatoes!

Cheers to you and good health, Kel





Top 10 Reasons to See a Paleo Registered Dietitian

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics posted an article, “Top 10 Reasons to Visit an RD,” and it inspired me to repost similar content but outline why a Paleo Registered Dietitian can suit your needs.

A trusted health care professional can serve as an integral liaison in helping you make change for a healthy lifestyle. See how consulting with a Paleo RD can benefit you.

  1. Diabetes: You have prediabetes or any other form of diabetes – T1, T2, Gestational and you want to gain control. A Paleo RD can change your life and your relationship with food by teaching you holistic, real-food approaches in eating a nutrient-dense diet, low to moderate carbohydrates and avoiding pro-inflammatory foods to help you best control your blood sugars.
  2. Community: Your community has high levels of obesity. A Paleo RD can work with local leaders, including doing presentations to schools, teachers and parents, to create wellness programs that promote healthy eating, sourcing high quality food locally and physical, natural movement for everyone.
  3. Media: You are a marketing manager for a food company/restaurant and know consumers’ preference for good-tasting food that is healthy. A Paleo RD can make the connection and work with your media campaign to develop new messages that will be successful in the marketplace.
  4. Performance: You want to improve your performance in sports. A Paleo RD can transition you to be fat-adapted, enhancing your ability to perform longer and better. Whether you’re running a marathon, skiing or jogging with your dog, you deserve to properly fuel your body with the right foods at the right amounts.
  5. Special Diets: More than 15 million people in the US have a food allergy and this does not even address food sensitivities  A Paleo RD dietitian will work with you to develop an eating plan for your new needs and even help uncover food sensitivities.
  6. Family Nutrition: A Paleo RD an help you take care of your family, from parents growing older and at risk for Alzheimer’s  dementia,  etc, to newborns and eventually starting on solids. A Paleo RD who has special culinary skills can teach you how to cook in a simple, convenient way as well as educate you on what foods to choose.
  7. Food Relationships: Perhaps you or your teenager has issues with food and eating healthfully. A Paleo RD can address the impact certain anti-nutrients have on our mental health. Please note if a condition such as anorexia, etc, can be addressed by a Paleo RD, yet, a RD who specializes in eating disorders should be your first attempt. I will plug the book Primal Body, Primal Mind as a go-to resource as well.
  8. Locavore: Your community wants more local foods to be available. A Paleo RD can inform you of some great options in how to connect with a nearby farmer, as well as, provide advice on how to grow your own produce or herbs.
  9. Time: You and your husband/wife have just started a family, perhaps you have moved, started a new job or hobby and time is just not there. A Paleo RD can help you get through and not put your health in the back burner
  10. Supplements: While all health professionals can agree, food first is the best approach in getting your needed nutrient intake, however, a Paleo RD can help you source the best needed supplements or food substitutes. Perhaps liver and onions are a thing of the past, but the nutritional bang for your buck you can get with this ancestral meal or a homemade bone broth may need to be revisited.
Regardless of the niche a health professional has, everyone needs some sort of coaching. From a personal trainer, to a running coach, a business mentor, to a Registered Dietitian. Treat yourself and see what a coach can offer you.
Cheers to you and good health,


Sildorf SM, er al. Remission without insulin therapy on gluten-free diet in a 6-year old boy with type 1 diabetes mellitus. BMJ Case Rep. June 21, 2012.

Jonsson, T, et al. Beneficial effects os a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study. Cardiovasc. Diabetol. 2009; 8: 35.

Cordain L. The Nutritional Characteristics of a Contemporary Diet Based Upon Paleolithic Food GroupsJANA. 2002; 5(3): 15-24.

Wolf, R. The Paleo Solution – The Original Human Diet. 2010.

Rosebud O. Robertsa, Lewis A. Roberts, Yonas E. Geda, Ruth H. Cha, V. Shane Pankratz, Helen M. O’Connor, David S. Knopman and Ronald C. Petersen, Relative Intake of Macronutrients Impacts Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment or Dementia, Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, 2012 

Wangen W. Healthier Without Wheat – A New Understanding of Wheat Allergies, Celiac Disease, and Non-Celiac Gluten Intolerance. 2009.

A Day (Diet) In the Life of Kelly

It has been awhile since I have posted my daily food intake and since moving my food options have varied be remain to be primal choices. Enjoy this observation and let me know if you have any questions.


  • Paleo pancakes – 2 free range eggs, lots of cinnamon, Himalayan sea salt, tablespoon or so of coconut flour, 1/8 cup of almond unsweetened milk, cocoa nibs (for texture, flavor and health benefits) and coconut oil (to grease the pan).
  • Black coffee
  • Water
  • 2 probiotics, 2 fish oils, 4,000 IU vitamin D

Side note on why I choose the above – I prefer coconut flour over almond meal/flour. Almond meal/flour is tasty but it is a huge intake of nuts, which have antinutrients. Nuts are a great fuel source but should be consumed in moderation.

I do not put any honey or sugar in my paleo pancakes simply because they are so good and do not need it.

The noted supplements are usually consistent day to day but my vitamin D dose with vary with my activities and recent time spent outside. I prefer cod liver oil but while traveling it is not as conducive.


  • Mixture of 2 soups I had in the refrigerator – one was freshly made, which is very similar to the known Weight Watchers cabbage soup and the second is a similar tomato-based soup made with sausage.
  • Handful of pecans, as a side.
  • Water

Snack – dill pickle half


  • Bowl of cabbage soup
  • Grilled chicken – shredded it and heated it in my soup
  • Water

(All leftovers I had around)

Snack – Homemade gluten free cookie with a teaspoon of almond butter on top, Water

If I were to be a self-critic I would view this day and suggest I did a pretty good idea. Is it perfect? No. But if I were to striving for perfection with what I ate, I do not think I would have enjoyed it as much and there would present an extra layer of stress; which we do not need in our busy day. I would however, suggest more raw food. I could have easily thrown in some of the garden peppers into my salad and to be honest, I didn’t because I was lazy. On to a new day with the new opportunity to succeed.

Cheers to you and good health,


My Hypoglycemia Go-To

As someone with type 1 diabetes and always on the go for work and fitness, I need to be armed with something to deal with low blood sugars (hypoglycemia). My go-to item to have in my hand bag are raisins. They are small enough you can judge just the right amount you need to lift your blood sugar, they are portable, surely last and can sit in your kitchen cabinet for ages.

My new virtual friend, Tracy, at California Raisins emailed last week offering a library of information on raisins and I could not help but eat it up; no pun intended.

Raisins are a staple item on my grocery list and it is nice to know that beyond a natural sweetness enhancer for recipes and snacks that they have many health benefits such as: lowering blood pressure, high in antioxidants, have signficant amounts of potassium, iron and dietary fiber and more.

Raisins fit nicely in most recipes especially casseroles, meats, salads, eggs (yes I said eggs) and trail mixes.

Next trip to the market consider an economical purchase of raisins to brighten a favorite meal.

As clearly mentioned above, raisins pack a healthful punch but all good things should be consumed in moderation.


Food For Thought: Himalayan Crystal Salt

Do you take a multivitamin? If so, would you be willing to swap it for something more natural and perhaps cheaper?

When eating a paleo or primal diet, there is little room for processed foods thus a low intake of sodium. Plus the hard cold facts on the idea of consuming salt/sodium is bad for your health is yet to be proven. Physiology clearly demonstrates that salt intake is managed by the healthy body itself (kidneys) and research indicates that a low-salt diet can actually be bad for us. A low sodium diet can activate the rennin-angiotensin system and the sympathetic nervous system, increase in insulin resistance and cause overt hydration.(1). Therefore, it is important to have some sodium in your diet and today’s post is to persuade you to go the extra mile to swap regular iodized table salt for the pink Himalayan Crystal salt. Here are a few selling points to ponder on how Himalayan Salt can be beneficial (table salt cannot hold a candle to this):

  • Regulates fluid balance
  • Promotes a healthy pH balance
  • Promotes blood sugar regularity
  • Supportes respiratory health and muscle cramps
  • Promoting sinus health
  • Promotes bone health and skin health
  • Regulates sleep
  • Supports sex drive
  • Regulates blood pressure in conjuction with water
  • Slows the processes of aging

Himalayan Crystal Salt has 80 plus minerals and elements including: potassium, calcium and magnesium (2).. So what do you think? Ideally I use Himalayan Crystal Salt in all of my cooking (when needed) and in my homemade nut butters. Side note, homemade macadamia nut butter is my new favorite thing. Oh my goodness is it good. Overall I have always salted my food; well have tried not to, but now table salt does not taste good to me. Himalayan Salt has a different taste and a much better one. Make the change and let me know how you go. I hope this information offered some new knowledge for you. Cheers to you and good health! 1. Harrison RA, Edwards R. Was Sid the slug worth GBP4 million? A population perspective or policy based evidence. 2. Frezenius Institute in Europe

What? That is Breakfast?

Have you ever put strawberries in an omelette? Have you ever put fruit in your eggs?

I know, I know. Sometimes I surprise myself with what I eat…

This morning and for the past week or so, I have come up with something pretty creative in the kitchen. Anyone willing to give it a try?

Straw-crazy Breakfast:
Begin by heating a skillet with coconut oil
Throw in 2 free-range eggs, over easy style but more done than not
While eggs cook, add in fresh ginger, sea salt, sliced mushrooms and 2 sliced strawberries

Viola. Try it. trust me. It is good. And good for you.

Cheers to you and good health!

Sunday Sessions & Food Log

Sundays are so homey. Do you agree? It’s a day for personal time, preparation for the week and to reminisce on what took place in the last few days.

Most Sundays, especially when the weather agrees, I go on a run or walk or head to the gym, think of what’s on for the next 5 days and what meals I can prep and package away for easy lunch and dinner decisions.

If I do not have the ingredients I need on Sunday, I make a loop to the grocery, then the health shop and then the market. I love the market so much, even if I do not want to buy anything. It is such a positive happy place and the vendors really make an effort to get to know their customers. Just yesterday the Healthy Cafe owners came out into the market and gave us a hug to see how we were doing.

However, if I do not get lunches and dinner together on Sunday for the week, I tend to get takeaway during the week at work and for dinner, I usually sacrifice time that can spent outside walking or time at the gym in the evening making something from scratch and even worse, may skip the idea of making food altogether and eat out again.

Moral of the story is it is well worth it to plan ahead. This is what my daily food log looks like along with my plans for meals.

Breakfast: 10:30AM
Coconut pancakes with nutbutter – ingredients included free range eggs, coconut flour, cinnamon, ginger, vanilla extract, salt coconut milk and coconut oil. Here is a recipe for almond meal pancakes, posted a few months back.
Fish oil
Allergy meds
Iced coffee, no sweetener nor sugar

Lunch: 1:45PM

Homemade nori rolls with avocado and shrimp

Snack: 3PM
Corn chips (5 or so) with organic cheddar cheese
1/2 banana and nutbutter

Exercise: 3:30PM
Walk – 4.75 miles

Dinner: 6PM
Fish and Spanish chorizo tacos – fresh guacamole, diced tomatoes, sauteed onions and pepper and more.

Meals for the week: I have to suggest this was not the best example of what I do on Sundays. Quite often I make massive meals including soups, chipotle style chicken and vegetables fajitas, grass fed burgers, frittatas, guacamole and more.

But on this Sunday, I bought fresh bell peppers and onions to assist with any meal of fish or meat.
Tonight’s dinner was purposefully made 3x larger- I plan on having the fish taco leftovers for lunch a few times this week.
I made hard boiled eggs for mornings on the go.
I usually make beef, lamb or kangaroo patties but will wait to buy some minced meat on a night we plan on grilling out.

Do you practice Sundays in a similar fashion? What meals to you usually make up?

Cheers to you and good health!

Food for Thought: Seaweed

Do you ever come across the situation of going for sushi, buying sashimi (nice option to avoid rice) and still desire something else to fill your plate and appetite? If you can relate to the above occasion or have an interest in knowing the awesome health benefits of seaweed, keep reading.

Nutrients Composition:

  • vitamins A (beta carotene)
  • vitamin C
  • potassium
  • iron
  • calcium
  • iodine (good for thyroid health)
  • magnesium
  • vitamin B-12 – which is not often found in vegetables, i.e. this is a great option if you are a low or meatless eater.

Seaweed Benefits:

  • As one of the most mineral and vitamin dense vegetables, you can nourish your body with less
  • literature suggests that seaweed can assist in detoxing, removing heavy metals from the intestines
  • prevents some cancers
  • lowers cholesterol
  • increases sexual desire
  • support the thyroid
  • lower blood pressure
  • treat anemia

The research on seaweed is young and in my opinion can use more exploration, but the above conclusions are surely not a shabby start.

Ways to Eat Seaweed:

  • soups, such as miso soups
  • salads, for example, cut up some nori (sushi wrappers) to mix in a  salad
  • side dishes
  • condiment, add some kelp seaweed to a smoothie
Where to Find:
Seaweed can be found in most specialty stores or oriental grocers.